Memoirs of John Quincy Adams: Comprising Portions of His Diary from 1795 to 1848, Volume 8

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J.B. Lippincott & Company, 1876
 

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Page 542 - And, independent of that, as myself an affectionate child of our Alma Mater, I would not be present to witness her disgrace in conferring her highest literary honors upon a barbarian who could not write a sentence of grammar and hardly could spell his own name.
Page 545 - This preservation photocopy was made at BookLab, Inc., in compliance with copyright law. The paper is Weyerhaeuser Cougar Opaque Natural, which exceeds ANSI Standard Z39.48-1984.
Page 475 - Thou art worthy, O Lord, to receive glory and honor and power: for thou hast created all things, and for thy pleasure they are and were created.
Page 344 - And when he came to himself, he said, how many hired servants of my father's have bread enough and to spare, and I perish with hunger...
Page 349 - For such an high priest became us, who is holy, harmless, undefiled, separate from sinners, and made higher than the heavens; who needeth not daily, as those high priests, to offer up sacrifice, first for His own sins, and then for the people's: for this He did once when He offered up Himself.
Page 442 - Mr. Clay said he did not care who it defied. To preserve, maintain, and strengthen the American system he would defy the South, the President, and the devil...
Page 362 - But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of that bread, and drink of that cup. For he that eateth and drinketh unworthily eateth and drinketh damnation to himself, not discerning the Lord's body.
Page 328 - But what my power might else exact, — like one Who having unto truth, by telling of it, Made such a sinner of his memory, To credit his own lie...
Page 311 - The terror is, that if he should be now withdrawn some shallowpated wild-cat like Philip P. Barbour, fit for nothing but to tear the Union to rags and tatters, would be appointed in his place.
Page 446 - Boast not thyself of to-morrow; for thou knowest not what a day may bring forth.

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