The Nineteenth Century, Volume 41

Front Cover
Henry S. King & Company, 1897
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 43 - ... in the last day, we may be found acceptable in thy sight; and receive that blessing which thy wellbeloved Son shall then pronounce to all that love and fear thee, saying, Come, ye blessed children of my Father, receive the kingdom prepared for you from the beginning of the world.
Page 279 - Uncared for, gird the windy grove, And flood the haunts of hern and crake ; Or into silver arrows break The sailing moon in creek and cove ; Till from the garden and the wild A fresh association blow, And year by year the landscape grow Familiar to the stranger's child ; As year by year the labourer tills His wonted glebe, or lops the glades ; And year by year our memory fades From all the circle of the hills.
Page 297 - After laying down my pen, I took several turns in a berceau, or covered walk of acacias, which commands a prospect of the country, the lake, and the mountains. The air was temperate, the sky was serene, the silver orb of the moon was reflected from the waters, and all nature was silent. I will not dissemble the first emotions of joy on the recovery of my freedom, and, perhaps, the establishment of my fame.
Page 765 - Let us not desert one another : we are an injured body. Although our productions have afforded more extensive and unaffected pleasure than those of any other literary corporation in the world, no species of composition has been so much decried. From pride, ignorance, or fashion, our foes are almost as many as our readers ; and while the abilities of the nine-hundredth abridger of the History of England...
Page 267 - O early ripe! to thy abundant store What could advancing age have added more? It might (what Nature never gives the young) Have taught the numbers of thy native tongue. But satire needs not those, and wit will shine Through the harsh cadence of a rugged line.
Page 808 - ... stones, a sovereign remedy to all diseases. A good vomit, I confess, a virtuous herb, if it be well qualified, opportunely taken, and medicinally used ; but as it is commonly abused by most men, which take it as tinkers do ale, 'tis a plague, a mischief, a violent purger of goods, lands, health; hellish, devilish and damned tobacco, the ruin and overthrow of body and soul.
Page 267 - Cui lecta potenter erit res , «> Nee facundia deseret hunc, nee lucidus ordo.
Page 269 - Yet it is by no means essential that a poet should accommodate his language to this traditional form, so that the harmony, which is its spirit, be observed. The practice is indeed convenient and popular, and to be preferred, especially in such composition as includes much action: but every great poet must inevitably innovate upon the example of his predecessors in the exact structure of his peculiar versification.
Page 295 - Remove far from me vanity and lies: give me neither poverty nor riches ; feed me with food convenient for me: lest I be full, and deny thee, and say, Who is the Lord? or lest I be poor, and steal, and take the name of my God in vain.
Page 47 - I have so often prayed ; and now, glory be to the Father, to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost"; and with these words his spirit fled.

Bibliographic information