Newton's London Journal of Arts and Sciences: Being Record of the Progress of Invention as Applied to the Arts..., Volume 24

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William Newton, Charles Frederick Partington
W. Newton, 1844
 

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Page 139 - Seal, particularly describing and ascertaining the Nature of his said Invention, and in what Manner the same was to be and might be performed, and...
Page 132 - Lighthouses have either one large central lamp, the outer wick of which is sometimes 3f inches in diameter, or many single Argand burners, each with its own parabolic reflector. The former is a fixed lamp ; the latter are frequently in motion. The former requires the simplest ventilating system, and is thus described : — The ventilating pipe or chimney is a copper tube, 4 inches in diameter, not, however, in one length, but divided into three or four pieces : the lower end of each of these pieces,...
Page 422 - Between this plate and the bottom of the vessel is introduced a current of steam by a pipe, so that it passes through the perforated plate and the madder which is upon it. During this process, which occupies from one to two hours, a substance is produced of a dark brown colour approaching to black.
Page 388 - London, artist, for certain improvements in cork and other stoppers, and a new composition or substance, which may be used as a substitute for, and in preference to, cork ; and a method or methods of manufacturing the said new composition or substance into bungs, stoppers, and other useful articles.
Page 54 - Waterloo-bridge, and thence to the top of the tower, where one of the telegraphs was placed. The wire then descended, and a plate of zinc attached to its extremity was plunged into the mud of the river ; a similar plate was attached to the extremity at the north side, and was immersed in the water. The circuit was thus completed by the entire breadth of the Thames, and the telegraphs acted as well as if the circuit was entirely metallic.
Page 56 - Leblanc has recently analysed carefully the confined air of inhabited places, and concludes, as stated in his memoir, that the proportion of carbonic acid gas in such places may be regarded as measuring, with sufficient exactness, the insalubrity of the air ; that in the proportion of 1 part to 100 of air, ventilation is indispensable for the prevention of injury to the health; that the proportion of carbonic acid gas had better not exceed a five-hundredth part, though it may rise without inconvenience...
Page 55 - ... be classed with it. Oil and gas both contain carbon and hydrogen, and it is by the combination of these elements, with the oxygen of the air, that light is evolved. The carbon produces carbonic acid, which is deleterious in its nature and oppressive in its action, in closed apartments, and the hydrogen produces water. A pound of oil contains about 0'12 of a pound of hydrogen, 0'78 of carbon, and...
Page 251 - ... in a few minutes the surface is covered with a fine film of metal, sufficient to insure a deposit of any required thickness on the article being connected with any of the electrical apparatus at present employed for coating articles with metal. The solution preferred to be used is prepared by dissolving 4 oz.
Page 420 - ... of spirits of wine, are dropped into it at different places; or the diluted oil of cloves may be mixed with the solution before it is poured upon the glass ; the more oil of cloves used, the more rapid will be the deposition of the silver ; but the operation should occupy about 2 hours.
Page 132 - When the chimney is put together, the upper end of the bottom piece is inserted about \ an inch into the cone of the next piece above, and fixed there by three ties or pins, so that the two pieces are firmly held together ; but there is still plenty of airway, or entrance, into the chimney between them. The same arrangement holds good with each succeeding piece. When the ventilating chimney is fixed in its place, it is adjusted, so that the lamp-chimney enters about...

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