Page images
PDF
EPUB

accomplishing what he promises, from his negociations in Turkey and Persia, and the threat he has expressed of invading our Indian provinces, are we authorized to hold him so cheap as to feel no solicitude on the subject? We must by this time be satisfied that the means we have hitherto employed to oppose his ambition, are insuffi. cient and nugatory; and our ministers cannot flatter themselves that by perseverance in their old "maxims they can work effects contrary to those which they have over and over again experienced, and that they can still claim the confidence of the nation which they have so often disappointed.

"It is evident that the taking part with the old established go. vernments, or the new ones that act on their principles, has only shewn our ministers that they deceive themselves, while they have overlooked, in every part of the world, those materials which Bonaparte has used, and of which they would not even deign to acknowledge the existence. Will they, after what every one knows of Turkey and Persia, disregard these facts, and take those broken and heterogeneous masses for homogeneous and integral states? Will they continue to act on this principle, and send troops and subsidies to those countries, without being conscious that they send them to the assistance of nobody, and to attain no object but disgrace? Are they so hardened in ignorance of facts, and stupidity to events, as to be totally unable to comprehend the elements of Bonaparte's progress? Are they determined to shut their eyes against that which every one sees, and to

[ocr errors]

defend themselves from the acknowledgment of their errors by invincible obstinacy? Are they de termined to continue the war, while they reject the only obvious means by which it can be waged with success? Would it not be more consistent to recommend submission, than to deprive us both of the advantages resulting from war, and the tranquillity of peace? But they are entangled in difficulties. from which they cannot extricate themselves. They see that peace and submission are synonymous terms. The bad success they have experienced makes them consider war as a dismal alternative. They have not candour enough to ac knowledge their errors, and act on a better system; and they have just enough ambition to wish to keep their places. They are sensible of the disgrace which awaits their half-digested counsels, and the fear of shame has not sufficient influence over them, to induce them either to act on more rational principles, or to retire from situa. tions to which they are unequal.

"Two lines of conduct are open before us-either we may submit to Bonaparte, and become a part of his immense empire, givers » up our laws and institutions, ours personal freedom, the security of property, the dominion of the seas, the commerce of the world, and what is more than all, the high character, we have hitherto borne as a great people, or we must contend with him in earnest, and oppose the greatness of his projects, by the magnitude of our own. Το continue blockading ports, taking possession of here and there a rock and a harbour, defending Spanish juntas and Sicilian tribunals,

and

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]
[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

General Instructions to Sir John Moore, before he set out on his March

to Spain. Plan of Leading a British Army into the Heart of Spain

-By whom formed.-The British Ministry deplorably ignorant both of

the French Force in Spain, and the real State of that Country.-The

French concentrated behind the Ebro.-The whole of their Force in

Cantonments and Garrisons-Exaggerated Accounts of the Enthusiasm

of the Spaniards.-Fond Credulity of the British Ministry on that Sub-

ject, and, in Consequence of this, the most romantic projects.-The flatter-

ing Expectations of Co-operation held out to Sir John Moore utterly dis-

appointed. Central Junta of Spain. - Their Character, incredible

Weakness and Folly-Traitors among them.-False Intelligence of

the Approach of the French in great Force to Salamanca.-Measures

announced by Sir John Moore under the Impression of this to the Junta

of that Place. Amazing Apathy and Indifference to Public Affairs

and the Fate of the Country-Tardy and deficient Supplies to our

Army-The Situation of Sir David Baird, who had landed in Gal-

licia, materially affected by the Defeat of the Spanish army of the North.

-Design of Sir John Moore to take a Line of Positions on the

Duero-Frustrated by the total Defeat of General Castanos-By this

the British General determined to retreat on Lisbon-This Plan of

Retreating abandoned, and why-False and treacherous Intelligence

transmitted by the Civil and Military Junta of Madrid to the Com-

mander of the British Army-Warmly seconded and supported by

Dispatches from Mr. Frêre-Strange Infatuation, as well as Arro-

gance and Presumption, of that Minister-Means by which the false

Intelligence was happily counteracted. The Force brought against

Spain by Buonaparte after the Conference of Erfurth.-The bold

Measures adopted by the British Commander for the Extrication

of

CHAP. II.

CHAP. IV.

CHAP. V.

CHAP. VI.

[merged small][ocr errors]
« PreviousContinue »