Studies in Philology, Volume 19

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University of North Carolina Press, 1922
 

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Page 185 - Henceforth I learn, that to obey is best, And love, with fear, the only God ; to walk As in his presence, ever to observe His providence, and on him sole depend...
Page 171 - Imports not, if thou reckon right; the rest From man or angel the great Architect Did wisely to conceal, and not divulge His secrets to be scanned by them who ought Rather admire ; or if they list to try Conjecture, he his fabric of the Heavens Hath left to their disputes, perhaps to move His laughter at their quaint opinions wide.
Page 145 - As therefore the state of man now is, what wisdom can there be to choose, what continence to forbear, without the knowledge of evil? He that can apprehend and consider vice with all her baits and seeming pleasures, and yet abstain, and yet distinguish, and yet prefer that which is truly better, he is the true warfaring Christian.
Page 157 - Fairest of stars, last in the train of night, If better thou belong not to the dawn, Sure pledge of day, that crown'st the smiling morn With thy bright circlet, praise him in thy sphere, While day arises, that sweet hour of prime.
Page 138 - This may be well : but what if God have seen, And death ensue ? then I shall be no more, And Adam, wedded to another Eve, Shall live with her enjoying, I extinct ; A death to think...
Page 144 - Olympian hill I soar, Above the flight of Pegasean wing. The meaning, not the name I call; for thou Nor of the Muses nine, nor on the top Of old Olympus dwell'st, but heavenly born.
Page 184 - When a man writes to the world, he summons up all his reason and deliberation to assist him; he searches, meditates, is industrious, and likely consults and confers with his judicious friends, after all which done he takes himself to be informed in what he writes, as well as any that writ before him.
Page 218 - Well, I will scourge those apes, And to these courteous eyes oppose a mirror, As large as is the stage whereon we act ; Where they shall see the time's deformity Anatomized in every nerve and sinew, With constant courage, and contempt of fear.
Page 199 - Why this is hell, nor am I out of it : Think'st thou that I who saw the face of God, And tasted the eternal joys of Heaven, Am not tormented with ten thousand hells, In being deprived of everlasting bliss ? O Faustus!
Page 182 - Heaven is for thee too high To know what passes there ; be lowly wise : Think only what concerns thee and thy being...

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