The Hand: Its Mechanism and Vital Endowments as Evincing Design

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W. Pickering, 1833 - 288 pages
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Page v - Pounds sterling ; this sum, with the accruing dividends thereon, to be held at the disposal of the President, for the time being, of the Royal Society of London, to be paid to the person or persons nominated by him. The Testator...
Page 275 - ... some ants carry corn, and some carry their young, and some go empty, and all to and fro a little heap of dust. It taketh away or...
Page 157 - ... admirably it is varied and accommodated to the functions, we shall add one other fact. The brain is insensible — that part of the brain, which if disturbed or diseased, takes away consciousness, is as insensible as the leather of our shoe ! That the brain may be touched, or a portion of it cut off, without interrupting the patient in the sentence that he is uttering...
Page 145 - ... any other hypothesis than that of a new creation of animals suited to the successive changes in the inorganic matter of the globe...
Page 162 - It in one hand, and placing the finger of the other on the pulse at the wrist, I satisfied myself that it was indeed the heart which I grasped. I then brought him to the king that he might behold and touch so extraordinary a thing, and that he might perceive, as I did, that unless when we touched the outer skin, or when...
Page 13 - The human hand is so beautifully formed, it has so fine a sensibility, that sensibility governs its motions so correctly, every effort of the will is answered so instantly, as if the hand itself were the seat of that will ; its actions are so powerful, so free, and yet so delicate...
Page 158 - ... so that sensibility here would only have the effect to expose man to superfluous suffering. " Reason on it, however, as we may, the fact is so; — the brain, through which every impression must be conveyed before it is perceived, is itself insensible. This informs us that sensibility is not a necessary attendant on the delicate texture of a living part, but that it must have an appropriate organ, and that it is an es)»xiat provision.
Page 151 - In pursuing the inquiry," says he, " we learn, with much interest, that when the bones, joints, and all the membranes and ligaments which cover them, are exposed, they may be cut, pricked, or even burned, without the patient or the animal suffering the slightest pain.

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