The New Statistical Account of Scotland: Linlithgow, Haddington Berwick

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W. Blackwood and Sons, 1845

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Page 93 - March 1863, complained of In the said appeal, be and the same is hereby reversed ; and it Is declared that the said marriage celebrated between the resp.
Page 297 - ... of the deep ? We felt ourselves necessarily carried back to the time when the schistus on which we stood was yet at the bottom of the sea, and when the sandstone before us was only beginning to be deposited in the shape of sand or mud, from the waters of a superincumbent ocean. An epoch still more remote presented itself, when even the most ancient of these rocks, instead of standing upright in vertical beds, lay in horizontal planes at the bottom of the sea, and was not yet disturbed by that...
Page 111 - Home lived in the closest habits of friendship. The writer of these memoirs has heard him dwell with delight on the scenes of their youthful days ; and he has to regret that many an anecdote to which he listened with pleasure, was not committed to a better record than a treacherous memory. Hamilton's mind is pictured in his verses. They are the easy and careless effusions of an elegant fancy and a chastened taste...
Page 297 - An epocha still more remote presented itself, when even the most ancient of these rocks, instead of standing upright in vertical beds, lay in horizontal planes at the bottom of the sea and was not yet disturbed by that immeasurable force which has burst asunder the solid pavement of the globe. Revolutions still more remote appeared in the distance of this extraordinary perspective. The mind seemed to grow giddy by looking so far into the abyss of time...
Page 297 - We often said to ourselves, What clearer evidence could we have had of the different formation of these rocks, and of the long interval which separated their formation, had we actually seen them emerging from the bosom of the deep? We felt ourselves...
Page 83 - HISTORY of the colonization of the free states of antiquity, applied to the present contest between Great Britain and her American colonies.
Page 297 - The mind seemed to grow giddy by looking so far into the abyss of time ; and while we listened with, earnestness and admiration to the philosopher who was now unfolding to us the order and series of these wonderful events, we became sensible how much farther reason may sometimes go than imagination can venture to follow.
Page 188 - what is this you have done to my brother William ?' — ' I told him,' says he, ' I should make him repent of his striking me at the yait lately.
Page 296 - ... southwards, in search of the termination of the secondary strata. We made for a high rocky point or head-land, the Siccar, near which, from our observations on shore, we knew that the object we were in search of was likely to be discovered. On landing at this point, we found that we actually trode on the primeval rock, which forms alternately the base and the summit of the present land. It is here a micaceous schistus, in beds nearly vertical, highly indurated, and stretching from...
Page 331 - Bass a few years ago [prior to 1844J in connexion with the chapel. A young lady, in the presence of her father, was here solemnly confirmed in the Romish faith and profession, and the due ritual services gone through in the presence of the keeper of the Bass and his boat assistant. On the conclusion of the solemnities the priest turned to the keeper, and asked him, with due decorum, if he would not ulso kneel down before the altar and follow them in a similar dedication and worship ? ' Me ! ' cried...

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