Addresses and Speeches on Various Occasions: 1869-1879 [i. e. 1878

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Little, Brown,, 1886
 

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Page 539 - Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens.
Page 546 - His integrity was most pure, his justice the most inflexible I have ever known — no motives of interest or consanguinity, of friendship or hatred, being able to bias his decision. He was, indeed, in every sense of the word, a wise, a good, and a great man.
Page 176 - And he led them forth by the right way, that they might go to a city of habitation.
Page 189 - The Particular Forms of Divine Worship, and the Rites and Ceremonies appointed to be used therein, being things in their own nature indifferent and alterable, and so acknowledged, it is but reasonable that, upon weighty and important considerations, according to the various exigencies of times and occasions, such changes and alterations should be made therein, as to those who are in places of authority should, from time to time, seem either necessary or expedient.
Page 539 - Promote, then, as an object of primary importance, institutions for the general diffusion of knowledge. In proportion as the structure of a government gives force to public opinion, it is essential that public opinion should be enlightened.
Page 538 - Citizens by birth or choice, of a common country, that country has a right to concentrate your affections. The name of AMERICAN, which belongs to you, in your national capacity, must always exalt the just pride of patriotism, more than any appellation derived from local discriminations.
Page 539 - From their natural tendency it is certain there will always be enough of that spirit for every salutary purpose, and there being constant danger of excess the effort ought to be by force of public opinion to mitigate and assuage it. A fire not to be quenched, it demands a uniform vigilance to prevent its bursting into a flame, lest instead of warming, it should consume.
Page 421 - There are also celestial bodies, and bodies terrestrial; but the glory of the celestial is one, and the glory of the terrestrial is another.
Page 280 - Agricola's Invasion to the Extinction of the last Jacobite Insurrection. By JOHN HILL BURTON, DCL, Historiographer-Royal for Scotland. New and Enlarged Edition. 8 vols., and Index. Crown 8vo, £3, 3s. History of the British Empire during the Reign of Queen Anne.
Page 548 - VIRGINIA gave us this imperial man Cast in the massive mould Of those high-statured ages old Which into grander forms our mortal metal ran ; She gave us this unblemished gentleman : What shall we give her back but love and praise As in the dear old unestranged days Before the inevitable wrong began ? Mother of States and undiminished men, Thou gavest us a country, giving him...

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