Travels in Russia: &c, &c, Volume 1

Front Cover
Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, 1828
 

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Page 116 - There is a pleasure in the pathless woods, There is a rapture on the lonely shore, There is society, where none intrudes, By the deep Sea, and music in its roar: I love not Man the less, but Nature more...
Page 296 - Now if any man build upon this foundation gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, stubble; every man's work shall be made manifest; for the day shall declare it, because it shall be revealed by fire; and the fire shall try every man's work of what sort it is.
Page 50 - Yea, the sparrow hath found an house, and the swallow a nest for herself, where she may lay her young, even thine altars, O Lord of hosts, my King, and my God.
Page 34 - SCOTLAND! much I love thy tranquil dales ; But most on Sabbath eve, when low the sun Slants through the upland copse, 'tis my delight, Wandering, and stopping oft, to hear the song Of kindred praise arise from humble roofs...
Page 295 - It would make a mere coxcomb of him to suppose he can be pleased with such adulation, or that he desires such homage. We worship no such God. Second commandment. The second commandment prohibits our making " the likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, the earth beneath, or the waters under the earth " (Exod. xx. 4) . Let us look, in the first place, at the effect of this prohibition, and then at the character of the act. It effectually cuts off the use of photographs, portraits, and pictures,...
Page 296 - Behold, ye trust in lying words, that cannot profit... will you steal, murder, and commit adultery, and swear falsely, and burn incense unto Baal, and walk after gods whom ye know not; and come and stand before me in this house, and say, we are delivered to do all these abominations?
Page 341 - And Abraham stood up from before his dead, and spake unto the sons of Heth, saying, I am a stranger and a sojourner with you : give me a possession of a burying place with you that I may bury my dead out of my sight.
Page 26 - For by means of a whorish woman a man is brought to a piece of bread: and the adulteress will hunt for the precious life.
Page 170 - Never were we driven with greater velocity, having travelled about eighteen English miles in the course of two hours and a quarter, the animals proceeding at full gallop, so that we were repeatedly apprehensive that we should be upset ; for as the roads are laid with trunks of trees covered with sand, the jolting was intolerable. There were but few farm houses, the population was scanty, and the houses and villages had a dark and gloomy aspect.
Page 20 - ... inactive, the desperate and crazy of either sex, and makes the starving sot behold his rags and nakedness with stupid indolence, or banter both in senseless laughter, and more insipid jests ; it is a fiery lake that sets the brain in flame, burns up the entrails, and scorches every part within ; and at the same time a Lethe of oblivion, in which the wretch immersed drowns his most pinching cares, and, with his reason, all anxious reflection on brats that cry for food, hard winter's frosts, and...

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