Lighthouses and Lightships: A Descriptive and Historical Account of Their Mode of Construction and Organization

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T. Nelson and Sons, 1870 - 322 pages
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Page 145 - On a buoy in the storm it floated and swung, And over the waves its warning rung.
Page 146 - On the deck the Rover takes his stand, So dark it is they see no land. Quoth Sir Ralph, " It will be lighter soon, For there is the dawn of the rising moon.
Page 145 - No STIR in the air, no stir in the sea: The ship was still as she could be; Her sails from heaven received no motion; Her keel was steady in the ocean. Without either sign or sound of their shock, The waves flowed over the Inchcape Rock; So little they rose, so little they fell, They did not move the Inchcape Bell.
Page 146 - Sir Ralph the Rover sailed away, He scoured the seas for many a day; And now grown rich with plundered store, He steers his course for Scotland's shore.
Page 146 - the breakers roar? For methinks we should be near the shore." "Now where we are I cannot tell. But I wish I could hear the Inchcape Bell.
Page 146 - Sir Ralph, the Rover, walked his deck, And he fixed his eye on the darker speck. He felt the cheering power of spring, It made him whistle, it made him sing; His heart was mirthful to excess; But the Rover's mirth was wickedness. His eye was on the Inchcape float; Quoth he, "My men, put out the boat; And row me to the Inchcape Rock, And I'll plague the Abbot of Aberbrothok.
Page 143 - Far in the bosom of the deep, O'er these wild shelves my watch I keep; A ruddy gem of changeful light, Bound on the dusky brow of night, The seaman bids my lustre hail, And scorns to strike his timorous. sail.
Page 147 - Christ! it is the Inchcape Rock!" Sir Ralph the Rover tore his hair, He curst himself in his despair: The waves rush in on every side; The ship is sinking beneath the tide. But even in his dying fear. One dreadful sound could the Rover hear, — A sound as if, with the Inchcape Bell, The Devil below was ringing his knell.
Page 145 - NO stir in the air, no stir in the sea, The ship was as still as she could be, Her sails from heaven received no motion, Her keel was steady in the ocean. Without either sign or sound of their shock The waves flowed over the Inchcape Rock ; So little they rose, so little they fell, They did not move the Inchcape Bell. The...
Page 278 - Gleam for a moment only in the blaze. And eager faces, as the light unveils, Gaze at the tower, and vanish while they gaze. The mariner remembers when a child, On his first voyage, he saw it fade and sink ; And when, returning from adventures wild, He saw it rise again o'er ocean's brink. Steadfast, serene, immovable, the same Year after year, through all the silent night Burns on for evermore that quenchless flame, Shines on that inextinguishable light...

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