Johns Hopkins University: Celebration of the Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Founding of the University, and Inauguration of Ira Remsen, LL. D., as President of the University. February Twenty-first and Twenty-second, 1902

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Johns Hopkins Press, 1902 - 182 pages
 

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Page 20 - ... to which the youths of fortune and talents from all parts thereof may be sent for the completion of their education, in all the branches of polite literature, in arts and sciences, in acquiring knowledge in the principles of politics and good government, and, as a matter of infinite importance in my judgment, by associating with each other, and forming friendships in juvenile years, be enabled to free themselves in a proper degree from those local prejudices and habitual jealousies which have...
Page 35 - Like clouds that rake the mountainsummits, Or waves that own no curbing hand. How fast has brother followed brother From sunshine to the sunless land ! Yet I, whose lids from infant slumber Were earlier raised, remain to hear A timid voice, that asks in whispers, " Who next will drop and disappear...
Page 20 - Looking anxiously forward to the accomplishment of so desirable an object as this is (in my estimation), my mind has not been able to contemplate any plan more likely to effect the measure, than the establishment of a...
Page 12 - Let thy Fatherly hand, we beseech thee, ever be over them : Let thy HOLY SPIRIT ever be with them : and so lead them in the knowledge and obedience of thy word, that in the end they may obtain everlasting life...
Page 86 - ... been one of extraordinary activity and remarkable development in the coal-tar industry, and before I pass to the economic aspect of the question I shall ask you to consider very superficially some of the main points in this advance. In no other industry than this have such extraordinarily rapid changes and gigantic developments taken place in so short a period, developments in which the scientific elucidation of abstract problems has gone hand in hand with inventive capacity, manufacturing skill,...
Page 107 - I want to testify that the Graduate School of Harvard University, started feebly in 1870 and 1871, did not thrive until the example of Johns Hopkins forced our faculty to put their strength into the development of our instruction for graduates.
Page 108 - I wish to mention as an achievement of this university under your leadership, that it has promoted, and taught others to promote, research, scientific investigation, the careful probing of external nature and man's nature in the hope of discovering some new thing which may lead on to another new thing.
Page 60 - Education in these United States. During this first period, the University idea has been introduced and established. Nor does the time within which this has taken place, date far back. There were no universities in this country before the war. There were, in fact, no large colleges. But, within thirty years, institutions have come into existence, possessing not only the name, but the character of universities; and old institutions have changed, not only their character, but their names. In other...
Page 34 - ... of the nature of the solar spectrum. For many years this place was the chief seat in this country for pure and advanced mathematics. The study of languages and literature, oriental, classical, and modern, has been assiduously promoted. Where has the Bible received more attention than is given to it in our Semitic department? where the study of ancient civilization in Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Palestine ? where did the Romance languages, in their philological aspect first receive attention ? To...
Page 107 - President Gilman, your first achievement here, with the help of your colleagues, your students, and your trustees, has been, to my thinking — and I have had good means of observation — the creation of a school of graduate studies, which not only has been in itself a strong and potent school, but which has lifted every other university in the country in its department of arts and sciences.

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