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" ... most general rule that we are enabled to give admits of many exceptions. The violation of the order of events among the phenomena of the former class, the suspension of gravity, for example, the deviation of any of the stars from their places or their... "
The Works of John Playfair ...: With a Memoir of the Author ... - Page 439
by John Playfair - 1822
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The Gentleman's Magazine, Volume 85, Part 1; Volume 117

1815 - 740 pages
...it will always be more wonderful that the violation of SUCB order should have taken place, than tnat any number of witnesses should be deceived themselves, or should be disposed to deceive others." From tbe Edinburgh Review for Sept. 1814, pp. 328—9. Mr. URBAN, /CONSIDERING the " Es«ai Philo\_^...
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The Gentleman's Magazine, Volume 85, Part 1; Volume 117

1815 - 704 pages
...always be more wonderful that the violation of siicn order should have taken place, than tnai ajiy number of witnesses should be deceived themselves, or should be disposed to deceive others." From the Edinburgh Review for Sept 1814, pp. 328— 9. Air. URBAN, /CONSIDERING the" Essai PhiloV>>...
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A history of the holy Bible, corrected and improved by G. Gleig, Volume 3

Thomas Stackhouse - 1817 - 636 pages
...is so strong, that no testimony can prevail against it. " It will always be more wonderful, he says, that the violation of such order should have taken place, than that any number of witnesses should have been deceived themselves, or should be disposed to deceive others." If this doctrine be true,...
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The Edinburgh Magazine and Literary Miscellany, Volume 86

1820 - 606 pages
...deviation of any of the stars from their places, or their courses in the heavens, &c. these are fiicts, of which the improbability is so strong, that no testimony...to increase the improbability of their violation. Sappose a man not at all versed in astronomy, who considers the moon merely as a luminous circle, that,...
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The Edinburgh magazine, and literary miscellany, a new series of ..., Volume 7

1820 - 596 pages
...deviation of any of the stars from their places, or their courses in the heavens, &c. these are tacts, of which the improbability is so strong, that no testimony...disposed to deceive others. " It is here very well wortli attending to, how much the extension of our knowledge "tends to give us confidence in the continuance...
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Directions for the study of theology, letters

George Gleig (bp. of Brechin.) - 1827 - 1124 pages
...is so strong, that no testimony can prevail against it. " It will always be more wonderful, he says, that the violation of such order should have taken place, than that any number of witnesses should have been deceived themselves, or should be disposed to deceive others.'" If this doctrine be true,...
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The Religious Monitor, and Evangelical Repository, Volume 3

1827 - 600 pages
...can privail against it. It will always be more wonderful that the violation of such order should take place, than that any number of witnesses should be deceived themselves, or be disposed to'decerVe others." "Against the uniformity of such laws ' ||s the motions of the heavenly...
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The London encyclopaedia, or, Universal dictionary of ..., Part 2, Volume 19

Thomas Curtis (of Grove house sch, Islington) - 420 pages
...testimony can prevail against it. ' It will always be more wonderful,' he says, ' that the violatien of such order should have taken place, than that any number of witnesses should have been deceived themselves, or should be disposed to deceive others.' If this doctrine be true,...
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Memoirs of the life and writings of Thomas Chalmers, Volume 1

William Hanna - 1849 - 572 pages
...example, the deviation of any of the stars from their places or their courses in the heavens, &c.,—these are facts of which the improbability is so strong...themselves, or should be disposed to deceive others. * * * Against the uniformity, therefore, of such laws, it is impossible for testimony to prevail."*...
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Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Thomas Chalmers, Volume 1

William Hanna - 1850 - 542 pages
...abounding in maxims of great use in the conduct of life as well as in the speculations of philosophy. * * * We may consider physical phenomena as divided into...themselves, or should be disposed to deceive others. * * * Against the uniformity, therefore, of such laws, it is impossible for testimony to prevail."*...
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