School Science and Mathematics, Volume 10

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Smith & Turton, 1910
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Page 210 - And so these men of Indostan Disputed loud and long, Each in his own opinion Exceeding stiff and strong, Though each was partly in the right, And all were in the wrong!
Page 39 - I have already said somewhere that mathematics is the art of giving the same name to different things.
Page 210 - IT was six men of Indostan To learning much inclined, Who went to see the Elephant (Though all of them were blind), That each by observation Might satisfy his mind. The First approached the Elephant, And happening to fall Against his broad and sturdy side, At once began to bawl: "God bless me! but the Elephant Is very like a wall!
Page 80 - York (representing the Association of Teachers of Mathematics in the Middle States and Maryland...
Page 142 - The candidate is expected to read intelligently all the books prescribed. He should read them as he reads other books; he is expected, not to know them minutely, but to have freshly in mind their most important parts.
Page 559 - The purpose of education is to give to the body and to the soul all the beauty and all the perfection of which they are capable.
Page 352 - In other words, education is the instruction of the intellect in the laws of Nature, under which name I include not merely things and their forces, but men and their ways ; and the fashioning of the affections and of the will into an earnest and loving desire to move in harmony with those laws.
Page 278 - Baltimore meeting of the American Federation of Teachers of the Mathematical and the Natural Sciences, in December, 1908, Mr.
Page 560 - They may be naturally arranged into: 1. Those activities which directly minister to self-preservation; 2. Those activities which, by securing the necessaries of life, indirectly minister to self-preservation; 3. Those activities which have for their end the rearing and discipline of offspring; 4. Those activities which are involved in the maintenance of proper social and political relations; 5. Those miscellaneous activities which make up the...
Page 14 - ... the acquainting ourselves with the best that has been known and said in the world, and thus with the history of the human spirit.

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