Bulletin, Issues 1-6

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1886
 

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Page 33 - ... distinct infection for every berry diseased. The manifestations of the black rot do not always appear as detailed above, for not infrequently the first evidence of the disease is the sudden appearance of one or more circular, slightly depressed spots of a bluish-black color, in the center of which there soon appear a few of the little pimples or pustules above referred to. These spots increase in size, the pimples in number, and ere long the berry exhibits the black and shriveled appearance already...
Page 20 - This grass is best adapted to warm climates, and has proved most valuable on warm, dry soils in the Southern States. Its chief value is for hay, in regions where other grasses fail on account of drought. If cut early the hay is of good quality, and several cuttings may be made in the season ; but if the cutting is delayed until the stalks are well grown, the hay is so coarse and hard that stock do not eat it readily. The seed may be sown at any time when the soil is warm and not too dry. Failures...
Page 59 - Bunch grass. This grass has a wide distribution, not only on the Sierras of California, but northward to British America, and eastward through all the interior region of Utah, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Colorado, and Nebraska to the Missouri River. It is a perennial, growing in dense tufts, whence its common name of bunch grass. The culms are 1 to 2 feet high, with about three narrow, convolute leaves, the upper one having a long, inflated sheath which incloses the base of the panicle, or apparently...
Page 42 - In districts in Europe subject to this disease the practice is quite generally followed of bathing or washing the vines, in early spring, before the buds have commenced to expand, with a strong solution (50 per cent.) of sulphate of iron, applied with an ordinary mop or a large sponge fixed to the end of a stick 2 or 3 feet long. This washing should be done when the atmosphere is damp, in order to prevent a too rapid evaporation of the iron solution, which otherwise might result in injury to the...
Page 40 - ... line, there is developed a well defined band of bright vermillion. Finally, under the action of the disease, the berries begin to wither and dry up, leaving nothing, apparently but the skin and the seeds. There is no browning of the tissues of the berry as in the case of the black rot, nor does the skin shrivel as in that disease, leaving prominent and very irregular ridges, but the circular spots first formed are easily seen and the colorings characteristic to the disease retained.
Page 60 - Seventeen years ago it was but sparse; now it occurs in all our cultivated grounds, covering them with a luxuriant vegetation after the crops of the summer have been removed.
Page 33 - ... its original size, the folds of the skin being closely pressed upon the seeds and raised into strong, prominent and irregular ridges. These last, and the little pimples which are easily seen with the naked eye, are characteristic of this form of rot. The rotted berries remain firmly attached to the supports for a long time, sometimes even till the following spring. The disease does not extend from one berry to another by contact, nor through the tissues of the pedicels and common peduncle, but...
Page 13 - These berries, when cut open, showed quite uniformly a discolored appearance before any trace of injury could be seen at the surface. As a rule, while most of the pulp remained unaffected, a zone of browned tissue could be seen running almost or quite around the fruit between the seeds and the skin. In sections of this diseased tissue I was...
Page 40 - These spots soon increase in size, elongating in the direction of the stria; of the bark, the central portion becomes more evidently depressed and usually takes on a grayish hue. The bark is finally destroyed, and, in severe cases, the woody tissues beneath appear as if burned or corroded, so deeply sometimes as to reach the pith. The appearance and action of the fungus on the leaves is similar to that upon the stems, and it is certainly very evident that where the diseased spots are numerous, and...

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