Patterns of Behavior: Konrad Lorenz, Niko Tinbergen, and the Founding of Ethology

Front Cover
University of Chicago Press, 2005 M03 15 - 636 pages
It is hard to imagine, by their very name, the life sciences not involving the study of living things, but until the twentieth century much of what was known in the field was based primarily on specimens that had long before taken their last breaths. Only in the last century has ethology—the study of animal behavior—emerged as a major field of the life sciences.

In Patterns of Behavior, Richard W. Burkhardt Jr. traces the scientific theories, practices, subjects, and settings integral to the construction of a discipline pivotal to our understanding of the diversity of life. Central to this tale are Konrad Lorenz and Niko Tinbergen, 1973 Nobel laureates whose research helped legitimize the field of ethology and bring international attention to the culture of behavioral research. Demonstrating how matters of practice, politics, and place all shaped "ethology's ecologies," Burkhardt's book offers a sensitive reading of the complex interplay of the field's celebrated pioneers and a richly textured reconstruction of ethology's transformation from a quiet backwater of natural history to the forefront of the biological sciences. Winner of the 2006 Pfizer Awad from the History of Science Society
 

Contents

one
11
Charles Otis Whitman Wallace Craig
17
two
59
three
127
four
187
five
231
six
281
seven
326
eight
370
nine
408
ten
447
Bibliography 579 Index
609
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

Necessary Knowledge
Henry Plotkin
No preview available - 2007

About the author (2005)

Richard W. Burkhardt Jr. is professor of history at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of The Spirit of System: Lamarck and Evolutionary Biology.

Bibliographic information