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Nuddea; Baboo Radhabinod Chowdry, of Amadpoor; Baboo Nobogopal Mozoomdar, of Jowgong; Baboo Ramabullub Ghoshal, of Dinehat, in Burdwan; Baboos Brojomohun Misser, Rammohun Misser, Brojomohun Chowdhry, Horropersad Puttanayack, of Protabpore, in Midnapoor.

FROM MR. HARRISON'S REPORT FOR THE QUARTER ENDING JANUARY 1857.

I now turn to Vernacular Education and Schools, and in my review for the sake of convenience commence with the District of Bhaugulpoor under Sub-Inspector Pundit Amar Nath Roy with three Sub-Deputies and two Circuit Teachers.

I may preface my remarks with a few words on the system adopted in the Zillahs generally. The Sub-Inspector has the management of the whole, and is ordinarily the only channel of communication and intelligence. To him come all the Reports and Returns from the Sub-Deputies and Circuit Teachers, and only an Abstract of these reaches me. Much, therefore, depends on him, for, receiving my information second hand, unless some glaring incident occurs, matters may be going on tolerably well or ill without my being able to pronounce decisively on them. It is only on my tour that, seeing things with my own eyes, I can form a correct judgment and give the due award of praise or blame. But there is this to be said, that in my travels the present state of things actually before me gives also undeniable evidence as to the past, and thus though the lazy may have escaped detection during the previous year, or some of the deserving have not met due encouragement, the mistake is rectified at the close, and I gain experience to guide me during the next and future years.

The English Schools taken as a whole are rising and improving, and as I have little opportunity for visiting them, I must attri

bute the advance to the Local Committees. Many gentlemen in these bodies take a real personal interest in the boys, and this class of members I believe to be on the increase. The Masters in the Zillah Schools are commonly inferior in abilities and attainments to those in Bengal, though some of the Head Masters by their diligence are gaining a name. We are worst off as regards second Masters, for I know no one of them in these parts who is fit to take charge of a School; they must, therefore, be passed over on the occurrence of a vacancy. The great interval between the salaries attached to the two posts (one being three times greater than the other) primarily causes this inferiority, and I would wish to raise the pay of the lower office to a standard more commensurate with that of the other. With the present School Assignments this, however, is impossible, the revenues from private subscriptions and fees being (except in Gya) much less than in Bengal. I see, therefore, no remedy but that of raising of Assignments, and the state of Behar being considered in connection with the recent date of most of the Schools, the proposition appears reasonable. The history of the Institutions in and near Calcutta bears out this view. From being entirely supported by Government, many have advanced and become nearly selfsupporting. We may expect the same results to follow here, the more quickly in proportion as our Schools are more efficient. Rupees 4,000 annually will permit the second Master's salary to be raised to Rupees 75, give an additional Junior Master, and relieve the now overcrowded lower classes, besides allowing the sum sanctioned for Library Books to be thus expended in lieu of being absorbed in the general current expenditure.

There have been no additional Grants-in-aid sanctioned this Quarter in my Division, and no Vernacular Scholarships will be taken up. I issued

Grants-in-aid.

Perwannahs to my Deputy Inspectors, describing the course to be studied, and the tests I should propose for gaining them; but none of the Schools are sufficiently advanced to compete this year.

During my progress through the Districts, I have sought every opportunity of conversing with both small and great, and have found great use in a few numbers of the Illustrated London News and Bradshaw's Railway Map of England. The very poorest and most ignorant can appreciate the difference between the two countries, when told that a paper with fifty or more excellent engravings, and as much print as in an ordinary book, is produced, and sent 10,000 miles at a cost of four annas; but for transmission along a twenty-fifth part of that distance in India, three annas is levied. Their own clothes also furnish me with another telling argument, and by such simple illustrations as these, I produce at least a counterbalance to their prejudices, which, however, I confess, I have not met with in any formidable shape; and I notice that in the same degree as I find my subordinates negligent or inefficient, so is each District reported to be more or less prejudiced.

FROM THE REPORT OF MR. H. WOODROW, M. A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS, EAST BENGAL, FOR THE YEAR 1856-57.

Division of East Bengal.

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2. The Education Division of East Bengal contains a population of 7,653,000, and an area of 33,600 square miles, or 227 persons to each square mile. In this Division, exclusive of Calcutta, there are under regular inspection—

12 Government English Schools.

6 Government Vernacular Schools.

1 Government Normal School.

1 Government Model School.
2 Grant-in-aid Superior Schools.
34 Grant-in-aid Intermediate Schools.
31 Grant-in-aid Elementary Schools.
150 Indigenous Schools under improvement.

237 Total.

3. The following Table shows the state during the last two years of the Government English Schools :

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From the totals of this Statement it must not be imagined that English Education has been stationary or declining. The contrary is the fact. Grant-in-aid Intermediate Schools show an increase of 3,000 boys. Nearly 100 boys have left or refrained from entering the Dacca Collegiate School, but only to enter the new self-supporting Schools of the town. The authorities of the

Education Department see with pleasure the progress of selfsupporting Institutions, even though a decline in Government Schools is the inevitable consequence. The Chittagong School seems to have fallen from 222 to 183; but these 40 boys have migrated to the adjacent endowed Grant-in-aid School.

4. The Russapuglah School is an exceptional Institution, being maintained at a great cost for the benefit of the members of the Mysore family. The young Princes are the only boarders, and pay no fee. Mussalman boys, as Day Scholars, are free. Hindu boys are admitted at a monthly payment of one Rupee, but Christian boys are absolutely and rigorously excluded. The average cost of each boy to Government is Rupees 16-4; but as this calculation includes both Boarders and Day Scholars, and as Boarders, on the average, cost four times as much as Day Scholars, while Day Scholars are by far the more numerous, the cost of each Prince is Rupees 40, and of each Day Scholar Rupees 10. The School is maintained on its present scale solely for the sake of the Princes, and therefore a larger proportion of the expense than Rupees 40 a month is due to them.

The monthly cost of each boy in the other Institutions, for the year ending 30th April 1857, is as follows:

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