Elements of chemistry: theoretical and practical, Volume 1

Front Cover
Parker, 1863
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Contents

Law of Volumes
15
Symbolic Notation
16
13
19
PARAGRAPH
22
Elasticity of Solids and Liquids
26
27
27
CHAPTER II
31
English System of Weights and Measures 18 French System of Weights and Measures 19 The Balance
32
Specific Gravity
34
Specific Gravity of Liquids 22 Specific Gravity of Solids
35
The Hydrometer
38
Correction for Weighings taken in
39
Reunion of Divided Surfaces
44
31
46
36
51
38
53
Diffusion of LiquidsMode of measuring
58
xvi
61
Adhesion of Gases to LiquidsSolubility of Gases
64
Cements
65
Passage of Gases through Diaphragms
70
Solution
78
Reflection from Plane Surfaces
97
Reflection from Curved Surfaces
98
Refraction
99
Law of the Sines
100
Refraction at Inclined Surfaces
101
Total Reflection
102
Wollastons Method of ascertaining Refractive Power
103
Prismatic Analysis of Light
104
Theory of ColoursAbsorption 105 a Dispersive Power
105
Fixed Lines in the SpectrumFraunhofers Lines
106
Spectrum AnalysisSpectroscope
107
Projection of Spectral Lines on Screen
108
Modes of obtaining Crystals
109
Change in the Refrangibility of LightFluorescence
110
Adhesion between Liquids
111
Complex Nature of Radiant Force 112 Phosphorogenic RaysPhosphoroscope
112
Velocity of LightIts Measurement
113
14 Frequency of Undulation in Different Colours 115 Interference
115
Change of Bulk in the act of Solidification
116
Double Refraction
117
Influence of Crystalline Form on Double Refraction
118
Polarization of Light by Double Refraction
119
Polarization by Reflection
120
Distinction between Common and Polarized Light
121
Polarization by a Bundle of Plates
122
Effect of the Analyser iu rotating the Plane of Polarization
123
Colours of Polarized Light
124
Colours in Plates cut perpendicular to the Axis
125
Coloured Circular Polarization
126
Magnetic Polarization
127
Isomorphism
128
Allotropy
134
Air ThermometersDifferential Thermoscope
135
PARAGRAPH
136
Theories of LightUndulations
140
149
150
Spheroidal State produced by Heat
198
CHAPTER V
205
Sources of HeatMechanical Equivalent of Heat
206
Nature of HeatMechanical Theory of Heat
210
ExpansionMeasurement of Tempera ture 212236 131 Difference between Heat and Temperature
212
Law of the Diminution of Light by Distance
213
Expansion of Liquids
214
Tests of a good Thermometer
220
Force exerted by Expansion
226
Determination of the Specific Gravity of Vapours
232
Inequality in the Rate of Conduction in different Directions
240
Gulf Stream
246
PARAGRAPH
248
Law of Cooling by Radiation
252
Influence of Structure on Diathermacy
259
a Causes of Variation of Specific Heat
269
214
272
NO
276
Electrotype or Voltatype Processes
292
Delucs Dry PileZambonis Pile
298
Magnetism of Bodies in general
323
Atomic Relations of Heat Evolved
335
Influence of Dimorphism
342
Heat Evolved during Metallic Precipitation
348
Simple Facts connected with Electricity
373
Distribution of the Electric Charge
378
Spread of Induction
384
Measures of Electricity
390
Development of Heat
396
Convection
404
Aurora Borealis
412
Galvanic or Voltaic Electricity 413511
413
Summary of the Effects produced by the Conducting Wire
419
Energy of the Current proportionate to the Chemical Activity
427
Circuits with One Metal and Two Liquids
433
Groves Gas Battery
439
Differences between a Simple and a Compound Circuit
446
The Voltameter
453
Processes of Voltaic Discharge
459
Conduction by Liquids
467
Chemical Actions
475
Electrochemical Actions
481
Unequal transfer of Ions during Electrolysis
488
Nascent state of Bodies
495
ElectroMagnetism
512
Ampères Theory of ElectroMagnetism
519
MagnetoElectricity
530
Henrys Coils
539
ThermoElectricity
547
Animal Electricity
553
Diamagnetism
560
Law of Diamagnetic Repulsion
566
Cohesion Figures
574
398
575
INDEX
578
Heat Absorbed during Solution of Salts
582
427 first line for 297 read 298

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Page 329 - On partially liquefying carbonic acid by pressure alone, and gradually raising at the same time the temperature to 88° Fahr., the surface of demarcation between the liquid and gas became fainter, lost its curvature, and at last disappeared. The space was then occupied by a homogeneous fluid, which exhibited, when the pressure was suddenly diminished or the temperature slightly lowered, a peculiar appearance of moving or flickering striae throughout its entire mass. At temperatures above 88° no...
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