Elements of chemistry: theoretical and practical, Volume 1

Front Cover
Parker, 1863
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Contents

Tables of Equivalent Numbers
17
Combining ProportionsEquivalentsAtoms
21
Application of the Law of Equivalent Proportions
25
Elasticity of Solids and Liquids
26
Law of Volumes
27
Repulsion among the particles of Gases
28
The AirPump
29
Symbolic Notation
30
CHAPTER II
31
English System of Weights and Measures
32
The Balance
33
Specific Gravity
34
Specific Gravity of Liquids
35
Specific Gravity of Solids
36
Downward Pressure of the Atmosphere
37
The Hydrometer
38
Correction for Weighings taken in Air
39
The Mercurial Trough
40
Correction of Gases for Pressure
41
Density of the Atmosphere at different heights
42
Cohesion 43 Measurement of Cohesion
43
Reunion of Divided Surfaces
44
Cohesion of Solids
45
Cohesion of Liquids
46
PARAGRAPH
58
xvi
61
Influence of Heat on Cohesion III AdhesionDiffusion of Liquids and 48 Adhesion
63
Cements
65
Capillary Action
66
Variation in degree of Capillary Action of Liquids 52 Capillary Depression of Mercury
68
Extensive Operation of Capillary Actions 54 Influence of Surface on Adhesion
70
Solution
72
Adhesion between Liquids
74
Cohesion Figures
75
63108 63
83
66
94
67
97
Expansion of Gases
100
68
101
69
102
Wollastons Method of ascertaining Refractive Power
103
70
105
Separation of Bodies by Cold or Heat
107
72
108
Kirchhoffs Theory of Fraunhofers Lines
109
74
111
Interference
115
Change of Bulk in the act of Solidification
116
Distinction between Common and Polarized Light
121
Magnetic Polarization
127
Isomorphism
128
Allotropy
134
Air ThermometersDifferential Thermoscope
135
Principle on which the Thermometer is Graduated
136
Tests of a good Thermometer
137
Different Forms of Thermometer
138
xii
161
Disappearance of Heat during LiquefactionLatent Heat 278
175
PAGE
177
Influence of Solids in Solution upon the Boiling Point
181
Economical Applications of Steam
187
92
190
ExpansionMeasurement of Tempera
212
Connexion of Electricity with Magnetism
214
Leading Characters of Magnetic Action
215
Magnetic Induction
216
217
217
Influence of Molecular Actions on Magnetism
218
Measurement of the Magnetic Intensity of a
219
The
220
Declination or Variation
221
Variation in the Intensity of the Earths Magnetism
222
Simple Facts connected with Electricity
223
Two Kinds of Electricity
224
PyrometersDaniells Pyrometer 141 Comparative Range of Temperature
225
Force exerted by Expansion
226
Anomalous Expansion of Water
227
Correction of Gases for Temperature
228
Adjustment of Bulk to Changes of Temperature 146 Process of taking Specific Gravity of Gases
229
Distribution of the Electric Charge
230
Electrical Machines
231
Determination of the Specific Gravity of Vapours
232
The Electrophorus
233
Spread of Induction
234
Connexion between Absorption and Radiation
249
Formation of
250
Simple Voltaic Circuits
251
Law of Cooling by Radiation
252
Relative Absorbability of different kinds of Heat
253
Transmission of Heat through ScreensDiathermacy
254
Diathermacy of Gases and Vapours
257
355572
258
Influence of Structure on Diathermacy
259
Refraction of Heat
262
Specific HeatLatent Heat 168 Specific Heat
263
Methods of Measuring Specific Heat
264
PARAGRAPH
280
PARAGRAPH
292
128
295
356
296
Delucs Dry PileZambonis Pile
298
Wet Bulb Hygrometer
320
Magnetism of Bodies in general
323
Pressure Exerted by Condensed Gases
326
Spheroidal State produced by Heat
332
Researches of Favre and Silbermann
339
Mercurial Calorimeter
346
Heat Evolved during the Action of Acids on Bases
354
366413
366
a Causes of Variation of Specific Heat 236
390
Specific Induction
393
Various Modes of Discharge 394 239 Conduction
394
240
396
241
398
Velocity of Discharge
399
243
401
Convection
404
245
405
247
407
248
408
Atmospheric ElectricityLightning Rods
409
249
412
250
413
252
415
253
416
254
417
257
422
259
424
260
427
Protection of Ships Sheathing
432
262
433
263334 263 264
436
265
439
Groves Nitric Acid BatteryBunsens Coke Battery 267 Smees Battery 268 Resistances to the Voltaic Current
444
Differences between a Simple and a Compound Circuit
446
Ohms Formulæ
449
Chemical Decomposition
451
The Voltameter
453
Further Application of Ohms Formula
454
Wheatstones Rheostat and Resistance Coils
456
Processes of Voltaic Discharge 276 ConductionConducting Power of Solids 277 Heating Effects in Wires
459
Conduction by Liquids 279 Conducting Power of Gases
469
Chemical Actions 282 Laws of Electrolysis
475
Relative Decomposability of Electrolytes
479
Electrochemical Actions 285 Electrolysis of Salts
481
Bearing of Electrolysis on the Theory of Salts
483
Unequal transfer of Ions during Electrolysis
488
Electrovection or Electrical Endosmose
489
Secondary results of Electrolysis
492
Nascent state of Bodies
495
512529
512
Ampères Theory of ElectroMagnetism
518
MagnetoElectricity
530
Henrys Coils
539
ThermoElectricity
547
Animal Electricity
553
Influence of Structure on Diamagnetism
564
Aurora Borealis
573
Variation in Amount of Specific Heat according to Physical State 269
574
398
575
405
576
269
577
275
578
483
581
412
582
488
583
99
584

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 331 - On partially liquefying carbonic acid by pressure alone, and gradually raising at the same time the temperature to 88° Fahr., the surface of demarcation between the liquid and gas became fainter, lost its curvature, and at last disappeared. The space was then occupied by a homogeneous fluid, which exhibited, when the pressure was suddenly diminished or the temperature slightly lowered, a peculiar appearance of moving or flickering striae throughout its entire mass. At temperatures above 88° no...
Page 213 - Temperature may be conceived to depend upon the velocities of the vibrations; increase of capacity on the motion being performed in greater space ; and the diminution of temperature during the conversion of solids into fluids or gases, may be explained on the idea of the loss of vibratory motion, in consequence of the revolution of particles round their axes, at the moment when the body becomes fluid or aeriform, or from the loss of rapidity of vibration in consequence of the motion of the particles...
Page 585 - With Additions by Professors AGASSIZ, PIERCE, and GRAY; 12 Maps and Engravings on Steel, some Coloured, and copious Index.
Page 213 - It seems possible to account for all the phenomena of heat, if it be supposed that in solids the particles are in a constant state of vibratory motion, the particles of the hottest bodies moving with the greatest velocity...
Page 208 - ... passing from the solid to the liquid, and from the liquid to the gaseous form, or the contrary, occasioning endless vicissitudes of temperature over the globe.
Page 585 - Reprinted from Williams's Holy City. With Illustrations. 9s. Plan of Jerusalem, from the Ordnance Survey. With a Memoir. Reprinted from Wuliams's Holy City.

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