Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Volume 7

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Royal Society of Edinburgh., 1872
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Page 573 - That gravity should be innate, inherent and essential to matter, so that one body may act upon another at a distance through a vacuum, without the mediation of any thing else, by and through which their action and force may be conveyed from one to another, is to me so great an absurdity, that I believe no man who has in philosophical matters a competent faculty of thinking, can ever fall into it.
Page 573 - It is inconceivable, that inanimate brute matter should, without the mediation of something else, which is not material, operate upon, and affect other matter without mutual contact; as it must do, if gravitation, in the sense of Epicurus, be essential and inherent in it.
Page 776 - THE THANATOPHIDIA OF INDIA; being a Description of the Venomous Snakes of the Indian Peninsula. With an Account of the Influence of their Poison on Life, and a Series of Experiments.
Page 574 - ... else, by and through which their action and force may be conveyed from one to another, is to me so great an absurdity that I believe no man, who has in philosophical matters a competent faculty of thinking, can ever fall into it. Gravity must be caused by an agent acting constantly according to certain laws ; but whether this agent be material or immaterial, I have left to the consideration of my readers" (3d letter to Bentley, 5th February 1692-93).
Page 216 - Report of the Proceedings of the Geological and Polytechnic Society of the West Riding of Yorkshire, 1863 — 4.
Page 519 - Reports on experiments made with the Bashforth chronograph to determine the resistance of the air to the motion of projectiles.
Page 31 - The length of the animal, measured from the tip of the lower jaw to the end of the tail, 78 feet 9 inches.
Page 786 - DISCUSSION of the METEOROLOGY of the PART of the ATLANTIC lying NORTH of 30° N.
Page 787 - HORN, &c -CONTRIBUTIONS to our KNOWLEDGE of the METEOROLOGY of CAPE HORN and the WEST COAST of SOUTH AMERICA.
Page 56 - I. (Proposition.) Consider first a single fixed body with one or more apertures through it ; as a particular example, a piece of straight tube open at each end. Let there be irrotational circulation of the fluid through one or more such apertures. It is readily proved [from VM § 63, Exam.

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