A Dictionary of General Knowledge, Or, An Explanation of Words and Things Connected with All the Arts and Sciences ; Illustrated with Numerous Wood Cuts

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Charles W. Samo, 1835 - 368 pages
 

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Page 141 - And the tables were the work of God, and the writing was the writing of God, graven upon the tables.
Page 34 - It seems that an assault is an attempt, or offer, with force and violence, to do a corporal hurt to another; as by striking at him with, or without, a weapon; or presenting a gun at him, at such a distance to which the gun will carry...
Page 176 - The circumference of every circle is supposed to be divided into 360 equal parts, called degrees ; and each degree into 60 equal parts, called minutes ; and each minute into 60 equal parts, called seconds ; and these into thirds, etc.
Page 252 - The aperture in the head of any animal at which the food is received ; the...
Page 149 - An exchange is a mutual grant of equal interests, the one in consideration of the other. The word "exchange...
Page 164 - The frustum of a cone is the part that remains, when the top is cut off by a plane parallel to the base; and is otherwise called a truncated cone. The frustum of a pyramid is also what remains, after the top is cut off" by a plane parallel to its base.
Page 203 - INFORMATION, in law, an accusation or complaint exhibited against a person for some criminal offence. An information differs from an indictment, inasmuch as the latter is exhibited on the oath of twelve men, but the information is only the allegation of the individual who exhibits it. — He who communicates to a magistrate a knowledge of the violations of law, is an informer...
Page 176 - The BASE of a figure is the side on which it is supposed to stand.
Page 332 - Egyptians, this figure with the head of a woman and the body of a lion...
Page 7 - The clouds seemed to ascend from the earth, and collect one upon the other, still preserving their usual form ; only their colour Was grey and monotonous for want of sufficient light hi the atmosphere.

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