From Kulja, Across the Tian Shan to Lob-Nor

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Sampson Low, Marston, Searle, & Rivington, 1879 - 251 pages
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Page 135 - Now, such persons as propose to cross the Desert take a week's rest in this town to refresh themselves and their cattle ; and then they make ready for the journey, taking with them a month's supply for man and beast.
Page 7 - And after the winter was over, having been well fed, well clothed, loaded with handsome presents, and supplied by the king with horses and travelling expenses, we proceeded to Armalec (the capital) of the Middle Empire. There we built a church, bought a piece of ground, dug wells, sung masses, and baptized several; preaching freely and openly, notwithstanding the fact that only the year before the bishop and six other Minor Friars had there undergone for Christ's sake a glorious martyrdom, illustrated...
Page 6 - Usbec, and laid before him the letters which we bore, with certain pieces of cloth, a great warhorse, some strong liquor, and the pope's presents. And after the winter was over, having been well fed, well clothed, loaded with handsome presents, and supplied by the king with horses and travelling expenses, we proceeded to Armalec (the capital) of the Middle Empire. There we built a church, bought a piece of ground, dug wells, sung masses, and baptized several; preaching freely and openly, notwithstanding...
Page 138 - The basin which fills in the horseshoe-shaped space encompassed by these gigantic elevations, though deeply depressed below them, stands at a height above the sea varying from 6,000 feet at the margin to about 2,000 in the middle, and formed the bed of an ancient sea. From its wall-like sides on the south, west, and north, the...
Page 138 - ... is bounded on the east by the Pamir, on the north by the Thian-Shan, and on the south by the Kuen-lun. Mongolia is divided into western Mongolia — called sometimes eastern Turkestan, but more properly the Tarim — and eastern Mongolia, or the Gobi Desert. The region that gives birth to the Tarim River is on a scale of grandeur such as no other river can boast. It is girt round by a wide amphitheatre of the loftiest and grandest mountains, rising in ridges of from 1 8, 000 to 20, 000 feet,...
Page 227 - Kamschatka about the beginning of July collect the foot-stalks of the radical leaves of this plant, and, after peeling off the rind, dry them separately in the sun; and then tying them in bundles, they lay them up carefully in the shade. In a short time afterwards, these dried stalks are covered over with a yellow saccharine efflorescence tasting like liquorice, and in this state they are eaten as a delicacy.
Page 25 - River. The walls are seen rising above the reeds in which the city is concealed. I have not been inside the city, but I have seen its walls distinctly from the sandy ridges in the vicinity. I was afraid to go amongst the ruins because of the bogs around and the venomous insects and snakes in the reeds. I was camped about them for several days with a party of Lop shepherds, who were here, pasturing their cattle.
Page 25 - ... city is concealed. I have not been inside the city, but I have seen its walls distinctly from the sandy ridges in the vicinity. I was afraid to go amongst the ruins because of the bogs around and the venomous insects and snakes in the reeds. I was camped about them for several days with a party of Lop shepherds, who were here pasturing their cattle. Besides, it is a notorious fact that people who do go among the ruins almost always die, because they cannot resist the temptation to steal the gold...
Page 227 - ... and then distilling the liquor to what degree of strength they please; which Gmelin says is more agreeable to the taste than spirits made from corn. This may, therefore, prove a good succedaneum for whisky, and prevent the consumption of much barley, which ought to be applied to better purposes.
Page 26 - ... boat when it was drawn into the dark passage. The top of the boat scraped the roof of the channel, and bits of stone continually fell upon him. After a long time he emerged, and found the bottom of his boat covered with nuggets of gold.

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