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Several new members, to wit: from Connecticut, Ebenezer Huntington, returned to serve in the place of Samuel W. Dane, appointed a Senter of the United States; from New Jersey, John A. Scudder, in the place of James Cox, dece.s.d, and from Maryland, Robert Wright, in the place of John Brown, resigned, appeared, produced their credentials, and took their seats; the oath to support the constitution of the United States, being first administered to them by Mr. Speaker, according to ..w.

And a quorum, consisting of a majority of the whole House, being present,

Ordered, That the Clerk of this House do acquaint the Senate therewith.

On motion of Mr. Dawson,

Ordered, That a committee be appointed, on the part of this House, jointly with the committee appointed on the part of the Senate, to wait on the President of the United States, and inform lim that a quorum of the two Houses is assembled and ready to receive any communications he may Le pleased to make to them. And a committee was appointed of Mr. Dawson and Mr. Shaw.

Ordered, That the Clerk of this House do acquaint the Senate therewith.

On motion of Mr. Smilie,

Ordered, That the Clerk of this House be directed to procure newspapers from any number of offices that the members may elect: Provided, that the expensc do not exceed the amount of three daily papers.

Ordered, That unless otherwise ordered, the daily hour to which the House shall stand adjourned, during the present session, be eleven o'clock in the fore

noon.

And then the House adjourned until to-morrow merning, eleven o'clock.

TUESDAY, December 4, 1810.

Several other members, to wit: From Massachu setts, Richard Cutts, Ebenezer Seaver, and Charles Turner, junior; from Rhode Island, Elisha R. Potter; from New York, Thomas R. Gold; from Pennsylvania, Robert Jenkins, and from Virginia, Burwell Bassett and John W. Eppes, appeared and took their seats in the House.

A new member, to wit: From New York, Samuel L. Mitchill, returned to serve in the place of William Denning, resigned, appeared, produced his credentials and took his seat in the House; the oath to support the constitution of the United States, being first administered to him by Mr. Speaker, according to law.

Jonathan Jennings, the delegate from the Indiana territory, and Julian Poydras, the delegate from the territory of Orleans, appeared and took their seats.

A message from the Senate by Mr. Otis, their Secretary:

Mr. Speaker....I am directed to inform this House, that a quorum of the Senate is assembled and ready to proceed to business. They have appointed a committee on their part, jointly with the committee appointed on the part of this House, to inform the Pre

sident of the United States that a quorum of the two Houses is assembled and ready to receive any communications that he may be pleased to make to them: And then he withdrew.

Mr. Dawson, from the joint committee appointed to wait on the President of the United States, reported that the committce had performed the service assigned them, and that the President answered, that he would make a communication to the two Houses of Congress to morrow at twelve o'clock.

And then the House adjourned until to-morrow morning, eleven o'clock.

WEDNESDAY, December 5, 1810.

Several other members, to wit: From New Hamp shire, Daniel Blaisdell and John C. Chamberlain, from Massachusetts, Josiah Quincy, Samuel Taggart, and Laban Wheaton; from Vermont, William Chamberlin, Martin Chittenden and Jonathan H. Hubbard; from Connecticut, Lewis B. Sturges; from New York, Vincent Matthews, Peter B. Porter and Ebenezer Sage, and from Rhode Island, Richard Jackson, jun. appeared and took their seats in the House.

A message, in writing, was received from the President of the United States, by Mr. Edward Coles, his secretary, who delivered in the same, and withdrew.

The said message was then read at the Clerk's table, and is as follows:

"Fellow citizens of the Senate

and of the House of Representatives....

"The embarrassments which have prevailed in our foreign relations, and so much employed the deliberations of Congress, make it a primary duty, in meeting you, to communicate whatever may have occurred, in that branch of our national affairs.

"The act of the last session of Congress, "concerning the commercial intercourse between the United States and Great Britain and France, and their dependencies," having invited, in a new form, a termination of their edicts against our neutral commerce, copies of the act were imm dinely forwarded to our ministers at London and Paris, with a view that its object might be within the early attention of the French and British governments.

"By the communication received through our minister at Paris, it appeared, that a knowledge of the act by the French government, was followed by a declaration that the Berlin and Milen decrees were revoked, and would cease to have effect on the first day of November ensuing. These being the only known edicts of France, within the description of the act, and the revocation of them being such that they ceased, at that date, to violate our neutral commerce, the fact, as prescribed by law, was announced by a proclamation bearing date the second day of Novem.

ber.

"It would have well accorded with the conciliatory views, indicated by this proceeding on the part of France, to have extended them to all the grounds of just complaint, which now remain unadjusted with the United States. It was particularly anticipated that as a further evidence of jus: dipositions towards them, restoration would have been immediately made of the property of our citizens srized under a misap. piiction of the principle of reprisals, combined with a misconstruction of a law of the United States. This expectation has not been fulfilled.

"From the British government no communication on the subject of the act has been received. To a communication from our minister at London of the revocation, by the French government, of its Berlin and Milan d crees, it was answered that the British system would be relinquished as soon as the repeal of the French decrees should have actually taken effect,

and the commerce of neutral nations have been restored to the condition in which it stood, previously to the promulgation of those decrees. This pledge, although it does not necessarily import, does not exclude the intention of relinquishing, along with the orders in council, the practice of those novel blockades which have a like effect of interrupting our neutral commerce. And this further justice to the United States is the rather to be looked for, inasmuch as the blockades in question, being not more contrary to the established law of nations, than inconsistent with the rules of blockade formally recognised by Great Bri tain herself, could have no alleged basis, other than the plea of retaliation, alleged as the basis of the orders in council. Under the modification of the original orders of November, one thousand eight hundred and seven, into the orders of April, one thousand eight hundred and nine, there is indeed scarcely a nominal distinction between the orders and the blockades. One of those illegitimate blockades, bearing date in May one thousand eight hundred and six, having been expressly avowed to be still unrescinded, and to be, in effect, comprehended in the orders in council, was too distinctly brought within the purview of the act of Congress, not to be comprehended in the explanation of the requisites to a com. pliance with it. The British government was accordingly apprized by our minister near it, that such was the light in which the subject was to be regarded.

"On the other important subjects depending between the United States and that government, no progress has been made, from which an early and satisfactory result can be relied on.

"In this new posture of our relations with those powers, the consideration of Congress will be properly turned to a removal of doubts which may occur in the exposition, and of difficulties in the execution of the act above cited.

"The commerce of the United States, with the north of Europe, heretofore much vexed by licentious

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