Neely's History of The Parliament of Religions and Religious Congresses at the World's Columbian Exposition, Volumes 1-2

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Walter Raleigh Houghton
F.T. Neely, 1893 - 1001 pages
 

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Page 36 - God is no respecter of persons, but in every nation he that feareth God and worketh righteousness is accepted of Him.
Page 465 - For other foundation can no man lay than that which is laid, which is Jesus Christ.
Page 635 - Yet I doubt not through the ages one increasing purpose runs, And the thoughts of men are widened with the process of the suns.
Page 469 - For we know in part, and we prophesy in part : but when that which is perfect is come, that which is in part shall be done away.
Page 687 - ... and hath made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on all the face of the earth, and hath determined the times before appointed and the bounds of their habitation ; that they should seek the Lord, if haply they might feel after him and find him, though he be not far from every one of us.
Page 324 - Canst thou by searching find out God? canst thou find out the Almighty unto perfection? It is as high as heaven; what canst thou do? deeper than hell; what canst thou know? The measure thereof is longer than the earth, and broader than the sea.
Page 365 - And he shall come again with glory to judge both the quick and the dead : Whose kingdom shall have no end.
Page 710 - The Almighty has His own purposes. "Woe unto the world because of offenses! for it must needs be that offenses come, but -woe to that man by whom the offense cometh.
Page 464 - Verily, verily, I say unto you, Moses gave you not that bread from heaven ; but my Father giveth you the true bread from heaven. For the bread of God is he which cometh down from heaven, and giveth life unto the world.
Page 645 - The United States of America and the Emperor of China cordially recognize the inherent and inalienable right of man to change his home and allegiance, and also the mutual advantage of the free migration and emigration of their citizens and subjects, respectively, from the one country to the other, for purposes of curiosity, of trade, or as permanent residents.

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