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" ... to have led to the discoveries of other geometrical properties, as the conchoid of Nicomedes, the cissoid of Diocles, and the quadratrix of Dinostratus. This latter geometrician was the follower and friend of Plato, whose devotion to the science of... "
A General History of Mathematics from the Earliest Times to the Middle of ... - Page 30
by Charles Bossut - 1803 - 540 pages
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Dictionary of the Mathematical and Physical Sciences, According to the ...

James Mitchell - 1823 - 684 pages
...geometry with great assiduity, about 390 years BC The celebrated inscription that he caused to be placed over the door of his school, " Let no one enter here who is ignorant of geometry," is a proof of the high estimation in which he held the latter science. To this philosopher we owe the...
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Lives of learned and eminent men, Volume 1

Lives - 1823 - 192 pages
...refreshing. Plato gave a large sum of money for a small spot of ground within this inclosure, and placed over the door of his school, " Let no one enter here who does not know geometry." This new school soon became very famous: the young men from every quarter...
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Glasgow Mechanics' Magazine, and Annals of Philosophy, Volume 5

1826 - 502 pages
...principal object of the instructions he gave his scholars : over the door of his school was written, " Let no one enter here who is ignorant of Geometry."...the cube could not fail of engaging his attention. He invented, for the purpose of finding two mean proportions, an instrument composed of two rules,...
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Elements of Geometry, Containing the First Six Books of Euclid

Euclid - 1826 - 236 pages
...principal object of instruction among his scholars. He had written over the door of his academy, " Let no one enter here who is ignorant of Geometry." The problem before-mentioned, viz. the duplication of the cube, particularly engaged his attention ; and although...
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Euclid's Elements of geometry, transl. To which are added, algebraic ...

Euclides - 1826 - 226 pages
...principal object of instruction among his scholars. He had written over the door of his academy, " Let no one enter here who is ignorant of Geometry." The problem before-mentioned, viz. the duplication of the cube, particularly engaged his attention ; and although...
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A dictionary of general knowledge; or, An explanation of words and things ...

George Crabb - 1830 - 438 pages
...friend of Plato, whose devotion to the science ol geometry was such that he caused it to be inscribed over the door of his school, * Let no one enter here who is ignorant ol geometry.' To Plato we are indebted for that branch of geometry known by the name of conic sections,...
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A Family Encyclopaedia: Or, An Explanation of Words and Things Connected ...

George Crabb - 1831 - 426 pages
...friend of Plato, whose devotion to the science of geometry was such that he caused it to be inscribed over the door of his school, ' Let no one enter here who is ignorant of geometry.' To Plato we are indebted for that branch of geometry known by the name of conic sections, of which...
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A Dictionary of General Knowledge, Or, An Explanation of Words and Things ...

George Crabb - 1835 - 368 pages
...friend of Plato, whose devotion to the science of geometry was such that he caused it to be inscribed over the door of his school, ' Let no one enter here who is ignorant of geometry.' To Plato we are indebted for that branch of geometry known by the name of conic sections, of which...
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Course of the history of modern philosophy, tr. by O.W. Wight, Volume 1

Claude Henri Victor Cousin - 1852 - 480 pages
...morality, hence his politics, and at first his decided taste for mathematics. Plato, it is said, wrote on the door of his school : Let no one enter here who is not a geometrician. You conceive, in fact, that the mathematical habit of considering in quantities...
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Course of the History of Modern Philosophy, Volume 1

Victor Cousin - 1856 - 478 pages
...morality, hence his politics, and at first his decided taste for mathematics. Plato, it is said, wrote on the door of his school: Let no one enter here who is not a geometrician. You conceive, in fact, that the mathematical habit of considering in quantities...
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