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" ... any account of them in writing. For he considered all attention to Mechanics, and every art that ministers to common uses, as mean and sordid, and placed his whole delight in those intellectual speculations, which, without any relation to the necessities... "
A General History of Mathematics from the Earliest Times to the Middle of ... - Page 61
by Charles Bossut - 1803 - 540 pages
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Plutarch's Lives, tr. by J. and W. Langhorne, Volumes 3-4

Plutarchus - 1810 - 746 pages
...machines he gained the reputation of a man endowed with divine rather than human knowledge, he yet did not vouchsafe to leave any account of them in writing. For he considered all attention to mechanies, and every art that ministers to common uses, as mean and sordid; and placed his whole delight...
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Plutarch's Lives: Translated from the Original Greek, Volume 3

Plutarch - 1811 - 352 pages
...machines he gained the reputation of a man endowed with divine rather than human knowledge, he yet did not vouchsafe to leave any account of them in writing....necessities of life, have an intrinsic excellence arising solely from truth and demonstration. If mechanical knowledge indeed be valuable for the curious frame...
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Plutarch's Lives, Volume 3

Plutarch - 1816 - 314 pages
...rouchsafe to leave any account of them in writing. For be considered all attention to mechanics, and ev«ry art that ministers to common uses, as mean and sordid ; and placed bis whole delight in those intellectual speculations which, without any relation to the necessities...
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An Essay on the Law of Patents for New Inventions

Thomas Green Fessenden - 1822 - 524 pages
...machines, he gained the reputation of a man of divine, rather than human knowledge, yet he did not vouchsafe to leave any account of them in writing....excellence, arising from truth and demonstration only." Surely nothing can be more preposterous than to entertain an opinion that those arts, which minister...
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Addresses Delivered at the Triennial Celebration ...

1824 - 706 pages
...a man endowed with divine rather than human knowledge, yet he did not vouchsafe to leave behind him any account of them in writing. For he considered...whole delight in those intellectual speculations, whiqh, without any relation to the necessities of life, have an intrinsic excellence arising from truth...
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Elements of the History of Philosophy and Science: From the Earliest ...

Thomas Morell - 1827 - 614 pages
...machines, he gained the reputation of a person endowed almost with divine knowledge ; yet he did not vouchsafe to leave any account of them in writing...considered all attention to mechanics, and every art which ministers merely to common uses, as mean and sordid, and placed his whole delight in those intellectual...
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Plutarch's Lives: Tr. from the Original Greek; with Notes ..., Volume 2

Plutarch - 1834 - 496 pages
...he gained the reputation of a man endowed with divine, rather than human knowlcd¿e, yet he did not vouchsafe to leave • any account of them in writing; for he considered all attention to mechanic3, and every art that ministers to common uses, as mean and sordid, and placed his whole delight...
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The Cotton Manufacture of Great Britain Systematically Investigated ...

Andrew Ure - 1836 - 478 pages
...accommodation. But according to his admirer, Plutarch, he disdained all such palpable problems, considering every art that ministers to common uses as mean and sordid, and placing his whole delight in those intellectual speculations which, without any reference to the necessities...
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Plutarch's Lives

Plutarch - 1841 - 790 pages
...he gained the reputation of a man endowed with divine, rather than human knowledge, yet he did not vouchsafe to leave any account of them in writing....considered all attention to mechanics, and every art that ministen to common uses, as mean and sordid, and placed his whole delight in those intellectual speculations,...
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The United States Magazine and Democratic Review, Volume 18

1846 - 506 pages
...he acquired the reputation of a man endowed with divine rather than human knowledge, he yet did not vouchsafe to leave any account of them in writing,...which, without any relation to the necessities of life, hare an intrinsic excellence, arising solely from truth and demonstration." To these, perhaps unnecessary...
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