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" The reason is, all bodies lose some of their weight in a fluid, and the weight which a body loses in a fluid, is to its whole weight, as the specific gravity of the fluid is to that of the body. "
A General History of Mathematics from the Earliest Times to the Middle of ... - Page 65
by Charles Bossut - 1803 - 540 pages
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A Course of Mathematics in Two Volumes for the Use of Academies as Well as ...

Charles Hutton - 1807 - 464 pages
...same. 285. Carol. 4. Hence the magnitude of the whole body, is to the magnitude of the part immersed, as the specific gravity of the fluid, is to that of the body. For, in bodies of equal weight, the densities, or specific gravities, are reciprocally as their...
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A Plain Elementary and Practical System of Natural Experimental Philosophy ...

John Ewing - 1809 - 664 pages
...weighing them in different fluids. 11. The weight, which a body loses in a fluid, is to its whole weight, as the specific gravity of the fluid is to that of the body. Because the weight, which the body loses in the fluid, is the weight of the fluid equal in bulk...
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A Course of Mathematics: In Three Volumes : Composed for the Use of the ...

Charles Hutton - 1811 - 494 pages
...same. 323. Corol. 4. Hence the magnitude of the whole bodyj is (o the magnitude of the psrt immersed, as the specific gravity of the fluid, is to that of the body. For, in bodies of equal weight, the densities, or specific gravities, are reciprocally as their...
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Tracts on Mathematical and Philosophical Subjects: Comprising Among Numerous ...

Charles Hutton - 1812 - 406 pages
...abm becoming equal, then x = am, or 1: m: ; a : x, that is, the whole length is to the part immersed, as the specific gravity of the fluid is to that of the cylinder. And , if the latter be equal to half the former, which is nearly the case of fir timber,...
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English 18th Century Dances, Volume 2

1812 - 352 pages
...weights are the same : hence, the magnitude of the whole body, is to the magnitude of the part immersed, as the specific gravity of the fluid, is to that of the body ; for in bodies of equal weight, the densities or specific gravities, arc reciprocally as their...
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Pantologia. A new (cabinet) cyclopædia, by J.M. Good, O. Gregory ..., Volume 5

John Mason Good - 1819 - 740 pages
...body is equal to the weight of a quantity of the fluid of the same bulk ns the part immersed. Hence, as the specific gravity of the fluid, is to that of the body, so is the whole magnitude of the body, to the magnitude of the part immersed. XIII. The specific...
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A Course of Mathematics for the Use of Academies, as Well as Private Tuition

Charles Hutton - 1822 - 680 pages
...same^ 323. CoTol. 4. Hence the magnitude of the whole bodys is to the magnitude of the part immersed, as the specific gravity of the fluid, is to that of the body. F^r, in bodies of equal weight, the densities, or specific gravities, are reeipro~ cially as...
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Dictionary of the Mathematical and Physical Sciences, According to the ...

James Mitchell - 1823 - 666 pages
...quantity of the fluid displaced by the part immerged, is equal to the weight of the whole body. And hence, as the specific gravity of the fluid is to that of the body, so is the whole magnitude of the body to the part immerged. The specific gravities of equal solids,...
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Register of Arts, and Journal of Patent Inventions, Volume 1

Luke Herbert - 1824 - 394 pages
...several solids specifically heavier than the fluid in which they are immersed, we must proceed thus : As the specific gravity of the fluid is to that of the solid, so is the weight which each solid loses, to its entire weight in air, because the weight lost...
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The Elements of Hydrostatics

Miles Bland - 1824 - 380 pages
...(sS).cr* x = s'r'2 110. When a body is immersed in a fluid, the weight lost is to the whole weight as the specific gravity of the fluid is to that of the solid. When a body is immersed in a fluid, the force with wfiich it descends will manifestly be equal...
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