Harvard Classics: Volume 25

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Collier, 1909 - 468 pages
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Contains: Autobiography, and Essay On Liberty by John Stuart Mill; and Characteristics, Inaugural Address, and Essay on Scott by Thomas Carlyle
 

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Page 404 - While earnest thou gazest, Comes boding of terror, Comes phantasm and error; Perplexes the bravest With doubt and misgiving. But heard are the Voices, Heard are the Sages, The Worlds and the Ages: " Choose well ; your choice is Brief, and yet endless. " Here eyes do regard you, In Eternity's stillness ; Here is all fulness, Ye brave, to reward you ; Work, and despair not.
Page 97 - What made Wordsworth's poems a medicine for my state of mind, was that they expressed, not mere outward beauty, but states of feeling, and of thought coloured by feeling, under the excitement of beauty.
Page 432 - He aye did as the lave did ; never made himsel' the great man, or took ony airs in the company. I've seen him in a...
Page 261 - Where, not the person's own character, but the traditions or customs of other people are the rule of conduct, there is wanting one of the principal ingredients of human happiness, and quite the chief ingredient of individual and social progress.
Page 212 - Essay is to assert one very simple principle, as entitled to govern absolutely the dealings of society with the individual in the way of compulsion and control, whether the means used be physical force in the form of legal penalties, or the moral coercion of public opinion. That principle is, that the sole end for which mankind are warranted, individually or collectively in interfering with the liberty of action of any of their number, is self-protection.
Page 232 - ... for opinion, or at least for its expression, still exist by law; and their enforcement is not, even in these times, so unexampled as to make it at all incredible that they may some day be revived in full force. In the year 1857, at the summer assizes of the county of Cornwall, an unfortunate man," said to be of unexceptionable conduct in all relations of life, was sentenced to twenty-one months' imprisonment, for uttering, and writing on a gate, some offensive words concerning Christianity.
Page 264 - Human nature is not a machine to be built after a model, and set to do exactly the work prescribed for it, but a tree, which requires to grow and develop itself on all sides, according to the tendency of the inward forces which make it a living thing.
Page 256 - First, if any opinion is compelled to silence, that opinion may, for aught we can certainly know, be true. To deny this is to assume our own infallibility. Secondly, though the silenced opinion be an error, it may, and very commonly does, contain a portion of truth; and since the general or prevailing opinion on any object is rarely or never the whole truth, it is only by the collision of adverse opinions that the remainder of the truth has any chance of being supplied.
Page 214 - ... things which whenever it is obviously a man's duty to do, he may rightfully be made responsible to society for not doing. A person may cause evil to others not only by his actions but by his inaction, and in neither case he is justly accountable to them for the injury.
Page 307 - Again, there are many acts which, being directly injurious only to the agents themselves, ought not to be legally interdicted, but which, if done publicly, are a violation of good manners, and coming thus within the category of offences against others, may rightly be prohibited.

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