A New Theory of Terrestrial Magnetism: (Read Before the New-York Lyceum of Natural History.)

Front Cover
G. & C. & H. Carvill, 1833 - 158 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 41 - Since all matter may be made to fill a smaller volume by cooling, it is evident that the particles of matter must have space between them ; and since every body can communicate the power of expansion to a body of a lower temperature, that is, can give an expansive motion to its particles, it is a probable inference that its own particles are possessed of motion; but as there is no change in the position of its parts as long as its temperature is uniform, the motion, if it...
Page 40 - When the temperature of bodies is raised by friction, there seems to be no diminution of their capacities, using the word in its common sense ; and in many chemical changes, connected with an increase of temperature, there appears to be likewise an increase of capacity. A piece of iron made red-hot by hammering, cannot be strongly heated a second time by the same means, unless it has been previously introduced into a fire. This fact has been explained by supposing that the fluid of heat has been...
Page 40 - ... attraction of gravitation on the great masses of matter composing the universe, and the repulsive force is analogous to the planetary projectile force. In his ' Chemical Philosophy,' pp. 94 and 95, Davy expresses himself thus : — ' By a moderate degree of friction, as it would appear from Rumford's experiments, the same piece of metal may be kept hot for any length of time ; so that, if the heat be pressed out, the quantity must be inexhaustible. When any body is cooled, it occupies a smaller...
Page 48 - ... to die of suffocation. But when in other rabbits, similarly treated, the galvanic power was transmitted along the nerve, below its section, to a disc of silver, placed closely in contact with the skin of the animal, opposite to its stomach, no difficulty of breathing occurred. The voltaic action being kept up for twentysix hours, the rabbits were then killed, and the parsley was found in as perfectly digested a state as that in healthy rabbits fed at the same time ; and their stomachs evolved...
Page 40 - The immediate cause of the phenomena of heat then is motion, and the laws of its communication are precisely the same, as the laws of the communication of motion.
Page 38 - ... millions of millions of times in a single second ! That it is by such movements communicated to the nerves of our eyes that we see ; nay, more, that it is the difference in the frequency of their recurrence which affects us with the sense of the diversity of colour.
Page 134 - The more the phenomena of the universe are studied, the more distinct their connection appears, the more simple their causes, the more magnificent their design, and the more wonderful the wisdom and power of their AUTHOR.
Page 90 - Oersted of Copenhagen, when he was travelling in England in 1823. Those which were made by this last philosopher in Edinburgh on the 4th July, and at which we had the pleasure of assisting, were performed in the field behind Coates Crescent, and nearly at the intersection of Walker Street and Melville Street. These possess considerable interest, as being the most westerly of all that have yet been made.
Page 39 - That, for instance, in acquiring the sensation of redness, our eyes are affected four hundred and eighty-two millions of millions of times ; of yellowness, five hundred and fortytwo millions of millions of times ; and of violet, seven hundred and seven millions of millions of times per second?
Page 47 - January 1816, he showed the immediate dependence of the secretory functions on the nervous influence. The eighth pair of nerves distributed to the stomach, and subservient to digestion, were divided by incisions in the necks of several living rabbits. After the operation, the parsley which they ate remained without alteration in their stomachs; and the animals, after evincing much difficulty of breathing, seemed to die of suffocation. But when in other rabbits, similarly treated, the galvanic power...

Bibliographic information