The Theory of Heat

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Macmillan, 1894 - 719 pages
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Page 42 - It is hardly necessary to add that anything which any insulated body, or system of bodies, can continue to furnish without limitation, cannot possibly be a material substance; and it appears to me to be extremely difficult, if not quite impossible, to form any distinct idea of anything capable of being excited and communicated in the manner the Heat was excited and communicated in these experiments, except it be MOTION.
Page 43 - The immediate cause of the phenomena of heat then is motion, and the laws of its communication are precisely the same, as the laws of the communication of motion.
Page 41 - ... great question which has so often been the subject of speculation among philosophers, namely, What is heat — is there any such thing as an igneous fluid ? Is there anything that, with propriety, can be called caloric...
Page 22 - The unit of heat generally employed is the quantity of heat necessary to raise the temperature of one gramme of pure water one degree centigrade. The same quantity of heat will be given out by one gramme in cooling 1° C.
Page 209 - ... the same quantity of heat is required to raise the temperature of a given mass of water one degree at any temperature between the freezing and boiling points.
Page 43 - Heat, then, or that power which prevents the actual contact of the corpuscles of bodies, and which is the cause of our peculiar sensations of heat and cold, may be defined a peculiar motion, probably a vibration of the corpuscles of bodies, tending to separate them, it may with propriety be called the repulsive motion.
Page 109 - The third thermometric scale is that of Reaumur. In this scale the freezing point is marked 0° and the boiling point 80°, the interval being divided into 80 equal parts. This scale is very generally used in Germany for domestic purposes, and possesses no advantages.
Page 74 - The hypothesis of molecular vortices is defined to be that which assumes, that each atom of matter consists of a nucleus or central point, enveloped by an elastic atmosphere, which is retained in its position by attractive forces, and that the elasticity due to heat arises from the centrifugal force of those atmospheres, revolving or oscillating about their nuclei or central points.
Page 502 - In the top space, a piece of magnetized sewing needle, furnished with a glass index, is suspended by a single filament of silk. It is evident that the arrangement is similar to that of a bratticed...
Page 34 - I think we may safely conclude, that ALL ATTEMPTS TO DISCOVER ANY EFFECT OF HEAT UPON THE APPARENT WEIGHTS OF BODIES WILL BE FRUITLESS.

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