Canada Medical Journal and Monthly Record of Medical and Surgical Science, Volume 1

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1865
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Page 368 - Containing over 3100 Prescriptions, collected from the Practice of the most Eminent Physicians and Surgeons — English, French, and American ; a Compendious History of the Materia Medica, Lists of the Doses of all Officinal and Established Preparations, and an Index of Diseases and their Remedies. By HENRY BEASLEY. Seventh Edition. Cloth, $2.00 Druggists' General Receipt Book. Comprising a copious Veterinary Formulary ; Recipes in Patent and Proprietary Medicines, Druggists...
Page 66 - Published under the direction of the general council of medical education and registration of the United Kingdom, pursuant to the medical act (1858).
Page 384 - ... illness, the only morbid appearance in the cutis was an occasional minute extravasation of blood in the neighbourhood of the sudoriferous ducts. The rete mucosum was greatly thickened, and numerous round cells with large nuclei were everywhere visible, intermixed with the natural cells. The basement membranes of the sweat-glands were thickened, and the epithelium lining them was so much increased that in most cases it obstructed their channels. In some of the sweat-glands the coils of which they...
Page 513 - ... objections or blemishes to this proceeding. A short leg to a long one is, I again admit, a defect ; but in this respect surgery no more fails than Nature does after disease. What, I ask, is the alternative for excision of the knee proposed by those who object to this operation ? It is amputation in the thigh ! I cannot allow that which might be an easy answer to the question — Why perform an operation at all ? Why not cure the disease, and thereby avoid amputation? That is a question of a totally...
Page 383 - ... tubes. In order to ascertain if these appearances were trustworthy as evidences of inflammation, the contents of the stomachs of forty-five subjects were examined at the Middlesex Hospital, the condition of the mucous membrane being at the same time noted. In only one were there any fibrinous casts, and it was in a case of acute gastritis.
Page 389 - As regards clothing, it is pointed out that in spite of modern improvements in this matter, it is still too much the custom to leave the upper part of the chest and the lower part of the abdomen exposed, and that hence come pulmonary affections on the one hand and bowel complaints on the other. " It is a fact that not only has the child less power of generating heat than the adult, but that it has also a much larger surface in proportion to the mass of its body, and will consequently be far...
Page 233 - We have examined this large volume with a good deal of care, and find that the author has completely exhausted the subject upon which he treats ; a more complete work, we think, it would be impossible to find. To the student of pharmacy the work is indispensable ; indeed, so far as we know, it...
Page 233 - Pharmacy in the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy. A Treatise on Pharmacy : designed as a Text-book for the Student, and as a Guide for the Physician and Pharmaceutist.
Page 484 - ... the knife if used without a guide. I therefore cut away about two-thirds of the tongue, and then, being able to reach the os hyoides with my finger, retained it there while the remaining attachments were divided by the knife in my other hand close to the bone. Some small arterial branches having been tied, the edges of the wound were brought together and retained by silver sutures, except at the lowest part, where the ligatures were allowed to maintain a drain for the discharge of fluids from...
Page 382 - ... lined by a newly-formed membrane. Sometimes no normal cells can be distinguished ; in other cases they are present, but are scattered irregularly. After the second or third week the tubes are found less distended than at an earlier period, and whilst their closed ends are still loaded with granular matters, which greatly obscure the gastric cells. These become more evident towards the surface of the mucous membrane. The cells at this period are sometimes very large, sometimes loaded with fat...

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