Quarterly Journal of the Chemical Society of London, Volume 54, Part 1

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Contents

WISLICENUS J Arrangement in Space of the Atoms in the Molecules
35
POLONOWSKY M Condensation of Glyoxal with Ethyl Malonate
38
18
39
BONDONNEAU and FORET Saccharification in Vegetable Tissues
41
KILIANI H Double Lactone of Metasaccharic Acid
47
KALLIR J Water of Crystallisation of dissolved Cobalt Salts
48
EMMERT A Two Dihydroxynaphthalenes
59
SÖDERBAUM H G and O WIDMAN Preparation and Oxidation Products
60
CONRAD M and L LIMPACH Synthesis of Dihydroxyquinaldinederiva
61
6 Methylethylpyridine and 2 4 Methylethylpyridine
65
1081
68
MORIN E C
73
Physiological Chemistry
77
HANRIOT M and C RICHET Influence of Diet on Respiratory Changes
79
IRVINE R Action of Bleaching Agents on Writing Ink 764
81
Chemistry of Vegetable Physiology and Agriculture
82
CLASON P Determination of Sulphur Chlorine Bromine and Iodine
86
LINDO D Estimation of Potash in Commercial Manures
89
LAURENT E Formation of Starch from Organic Solutions by Plants
90
GIBSON J Laboratory Fittings
97
GUBKIN J Electrolytic Separation of the Metal on the Free Surface
101
1016
105
TISHTCHENKO W Action of Halogens on Oxymethylene
106
VARET R Ammoniozinc Cyanides
107
NAHRWOLD R Electrification of a Gas by a Glowing Platinum Wire
108
RAMMELSBERG C Atomic Weight of Yttrium Metals in their Natural
112
Garnet in the Ural Mountains
115
BOGUSKI J J
121
ABENIUS P W and O WIDMANN Bromacetoorthotoluide and some
124
OSTERSETZER O Apparatus for Direct Estimation of Carbonic
125
NEUMANN E Pathological Pigments
127
OUVRARD L Phosphates of the Cerite Metals
128
801
132
MICHAEL A Constitution of Levulinic and Maleic Acids
134
BERGET A Thermal Conductivity of Mercury above 100
137
POSPĚCHOFF V Azopseudocumene
140
RÖSE B Determination of Fat in Milk
145
PECHMANN H v Isonitrosocompounds
146
Acid and of Hydroxylamine
148
WISLICENUS J Action of Phthalyl Dichloride on Ethyl Sodiomalonate
149
46
152
FEHRMANN W Auramines
156
THOMS H Bitter Principle of Calamusroot
162
78
163
PAIJKULL L Mucin of Bile
169
STUTZER A and A ISBERT Relation of Carbohydrates in Food to Diges
170
WOLFF C H Detection of Blood in Urine 880
176
LIEBERMANN L Animal Dextrin
177
WOOLDRIDGE L C Changes Effected by Digestion on Fibrinogen
178
BOUCHARD C Naphthol as an Antiseptic Medicine
183
PITSCH G Are Nitrates Indispensable to the Growth of Field Crops?
184
GAUTIER A and R DROUIN Absorption of Nitrogen by Soils
186
VOGEL H W Difference between the Colouring Matters of Bilberry
188
LIEBENBERG v Manuring of Winter Wheat and Winter
190
Chambers
193
FERRY DE LA BELLONE Detection of Blood Stains
195
ENGEL Hydrochlorides of Bismuth and Antimony Chlorides
196
PRINGSHEIM E Chemical Action of Light on a Mixture of Chlorine
205
HAMPE W Electrolytic Conduction of Halogen Compounds
211
JÄGER G Relative Size of Molecules calculated from the Electric Con
217
MEYER L Preparation of Hydrogen Iodide
219
MÜLLER M Action of Water on Lead
225
citric Acids
229
1021
230
KNORRE G v and P OLSCHEWSKY Antimoniates
231
ENGLER C Formation of Petroleum
235
SANDBERGER F Mineral Veins
237
GUSTAVSON G Preparation of Trimethylene
240
JANECEK G Electrolysis of the Acids of Phosphorus
242
EKSTRAND Å G and C J JOHANSON Carbohydrates
246
BILTZ H Influence of the Shape of the Bulb in Vapourdensity Deter
250
FITTIG R and H SCHLOESSER Condensation of Ethyl Benzoylacetate
251
MAYER A Analyses of Rubbish Heaps employed to Improve Soils
254
WILL W Constitution of the Compound obtained by acting on Tri
262
NIETZKI R and F KEHRMANN Hydroxyquinones
263
1023
269
NOLTING E and F BINDER Diazoamidocompounds
271
ANSCHÜTZ R Formation of Anilic Acids from Bibasic Acids
277
191
282
POLIS A Aromatic Leadcompounds
283
BAITHER 0 Tetramethyldiamidothiobenzophenone
289
MORSE H N and W M BURTON Removal of Iodate from Iodide
296
313
297
DE SAINT MARTIN L Influence of Sleep on the Activity of Respiratory
305
PISENTI G Physiological Action of Thallin
311
Mosso Physiological Action of Cocaïne
312
ABENIUS P W Lactones derived from Glycines
313
WOLLNY E Influence of a Crop or Covering on the Physical Characters
316
WOLFF E and C KREUZHAGE Behaviour of Various Plants towards
320
1182
326
LORENZ N v Analysis of Materials containing Tartaric Acid
327
BOIS BAUDRAN L DE Degree of Oxidation of Chromium and Manganese
329
1024
331
BALBIANO L Basic Cupric Chromate
332
PINNETTE J Boiling Points and Specific Volumes of Phenols and their
335
BOHLIG E Testing Potassium Carbonate
339
GOLDSCHMIEDT G Papaverine
340
SPRING W and J H VANT HOFF Chemical Decomposition produced
342
202
343
CAILLETET L and E COLARDEAU Freezing Mixtures containing Solid
344
SCHEURERKESTNER and MEUNIERDOLFUS An English Coal
345
RIGGS R B Socalled Indicolite from Harlem
351
ROBINSON F C Blue Clay from Farmington Maine
352
and Ethyl
356
REICHER L T Temperature of Conversion of Copper Calcium Acetate
359
WISLICENUS W Action of Ethyl Isobutyrate and of other Ethereal Salts
361
NEUMANN G Apparatus for Quantitative Analysis
363
MEYER V Constitution of Mixed Azocompounds
366
SALZER T Behaviour of some Acids towards Chromic Acid and Perman
367
815
368
HINSBERG O Action of Glyoxal on Aromatic Amines
372
HARTMANN W Specific Rotation of Dextrocamphoric Acid and its Salts
378
EINHORN A Cocaïne
381
DEHÉRAIN P P Experimental Cultivation of Sugarbeet in 1887
383
LANDOLT M Polaristrobometric Analysis
386
GLADSTONE J H Dispersion Equivalents
389
COHN E and L ARONS Conductivity and Specific Inductive Capacity
395
SPRING W Chemical Action between Substances in the Solid State
397
FAY I W Relation between the Heats of Formation of Chlorides
401
MEYER V Raoults Method of Determining Molecular Weights
407
LISSENKO K Decomposition of Petroleum by Heat
436
819
438
WOHL A Amidoacetals
443
203
444
BANDROWSKI E V Derivatives of Paraphenolphenylamine 943
445
BÉHAL A Alcoholic Nitrate of Silver as a Reagent for Acetylenic Hydro
447
BULITSCH P Oxidation of Diallyloxalic Acid
449
Diacetylracemate by Raoults Method 1273
454
Mosso U Chlorophenols
456
1108
460
204
461
MEHNE P Nitrosotoluidines
463
GATTERMANN L and G WICHMANN Two Byeproducts in the Technical
466
HANTZSCH A and F HERRMANN Desmotropy 954
467
Kock E Aromatic Nitrosobases
469
KÜнN B and E HENSCHEL Substituted Biurets
474
SALOMONSON H W Nitrophenylparaconic Acid
480
JEAURENARD A Condensation of Phenylacetaldehyde with Ammonia
484
WITT O N Derivatives of aNaphthol
486
WITT O N Naphthalenederivatives
492
PETERSEN F C Pyrrolidine
498
CONRAD M and L LIMPACH Synthesis of 2 4 Phenylhydroxyquinoline
505
BREMER G J W Cause of the Change of Specific Rotatory Power under
512
HALLIBURTON W D Coagulation of the Blood
514
SMOLKA A and A FRIEDREICH New Method for the Preparation
519
PLATH H Nitrification of Ammonia and its Salts
521
Tobacco and Bacteria
523
CLASSEN A Quantitative Analysis by Electrolysis
528
BORNTRÄGER A Determination of Tartaric Acid in Wine Lees and
536
PLANCK M Hypothesis of the Dissociation of Salts in very Dilute
537
LOVE E F J Comparing Spectra
542
LELLMANN E and W GELLER Piperidine
547
RÖNTGEN W C and J SCHNEIDER Compressibility of Water
548
PATTINSON J Rate at which Bleaching Powder loses its available Chlorine
552
Carbon
557
DITTE A Action of Vanadic Anhydride on Alkaline Fluorides
558
MACIVOR R W E Gold Alunite and Sulphur from New South
560
RATHGEN F Determination of Sugar in Liqueurs Confectionery
563
MÜLLER W Chiastolite
566
DICKIE A Water of the Clyde Sea Area
569
FRANKE B Firedamp
570
WILM T Potassium Platinocyanide
571
CURTIUS T and F GOEBEL Ethereal Amidoacetates
576
999
581
HAGEN M Trimethyluracil
582
DREHSCHMIDT H Absorption of Carbonic Oxide by Cuprous Chloride
584
FAUCONNIER A Action of Aniline on Epichlorhydrin
586
910
587
FOGH J Dimethylanilinequinonimide
592
ANSCHÜTZ R Determination of the Molecular Weight of Dimethyl
595
89
598
BAMBERGER E and R MÜLLER BTetrahydronaphthylamine
599
KELBE W Retene from Resin Oil
605
NIETZKI R and R OTTO Safranines and Dyes related therewith
607
1116
608
AHRENS F B Sparteïne
611
EDLEFSEN Behaviour of Urine after the Ingestion of Naphthalene
615
1000
617
BEKETOFF N Energy of Compounds and the Oxides of Potassium
621
LINDNER P New Lactic Ferment Occurring in Malt Wort
622
RIDSDALE C H Simplified Chromometer
625
BISCHOFF C A Ethyl Acetylenetetracarboxylate
626
ARRHENIUS S Theory of Isohydric Solutions
631
1001
632
LIVEING G D and J DEWAR Spectrum of the Oxyhydrogen Flame
637
WALDEN P Determination of the Size of the Molecules of Salts from
639
BACHMAN I A Freezing Mixture
643
DENNSTEDT M and J ZIMMERMANN Bases formed by the Action
644
CLAUDON E and E C MORIN Apparatus for Fractional Distillation
646
Inorganic Chemistry
647
Hydroxides in the Dry
650
28
653
SELLA A Sellaite
657
WINCKLER C Firedamp
663
Synthesis of Polyatomic
666
1144
671
OTTO R Action of Carbonyl Chloride on Sodium Formate
672
GRISSOM R G and B THORP New Halogen Compounds of Lead
676
SCHEFFER J D R Experiments on the Diffusion of Aqueous Solutions 1144
677
MARCKWALD W Furfuralmalonic Acid
678
KUTSCHIG C v Reaction Product of Phosphorus Pentasulphide
680
HERZIG J Action of Sulphuric Acid on Bromoderivatives of Benzene 1275
683
HERARD F Amorphous Antimony
684
ROOZEBOOM H W B Triple and Multiple Points regarded as Transition
689
CLAISEN L and L FISCHER Benzoylaldehyde
690
VAN ROMBURGH P Nitramine derived from Tetramethyldiamidobenzo
691
FAVORSKY A Isomeric Change of Disubstituted Acetylenes and of
692
REISSERT A Condensationproducts from Anilidoacids
694
ANSCHÜTZ R Reisserts Pyranil pyroinlactone Pyranilpyroic Acid
695
METZELER K Iodinederivatives of Quinone 1278
697
BRAUN E and V MEYER Aldines
700
BISCHOFF E Action of Nitrous Acid on Tetramethyldiamidobenzophe
702
BRUYLANTS J Thiocyanic Acid in the Animal Organism
704
KNOEVENAGEL E Bidesyls
706
1027
708
ZINCKE T and H THELEN
709
BAMBERGER E and R MÜLLER Tetrahydro8naphthylamine
712
HIRSCH R aNaphthylaminedmonosulphonic Acid
714
KABLUKOFF I Derivatives of Hexyl Glycerol
715
WELD H W Analysis of Lockport Sandstone 925
716
SACHSE H Additive Derivatives of Dianthryl
718
WARREN H N Solvent Action of Rochelle Salt on Metallic Hydroxides 1131
721
WEGERHOFF P Intramolecular Change of Phenanthraquinonemonoxime 1200
724
LEA M C Combination of Silver Chloride with Metallic Chlorides
725
1151
726
MICHAEL A and H PENDLETON Alloiscmerism in the Crotonic Acid
728
GUARESCHI I Ptomaïnes
731
BOAS J Digestion of Albumin
733
JACQUEMIN G Saccharomyces ellipsoideus and its Use in the Prepara
738
LANGE Acidity of Cell Sap
744
WALLACH 0 Terpenes
746
JOHANNSEN W Mealy and Steely Barley
748
DARSONVAL A Calorimetry at Constant Temperatures 773
749
CHIOZZA L Formation of Eugenol from Coniferin
750
CONTAMINE Determination of Hydrogen Peroxide
751
PICKERING S U Constitution of Basic Salts
752
PAGLIANI S Crystallisation of Salts during the Electrolysis of their Solu
757
HAAS B Estimation of Hydrogen Potassium Tartarate and Free Tartaric
759
ARNOLD J O
763

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Page 104 - ... salt fuses at 290° with decomposition. Towards acids and solvents, the crystallized compound behaves like that precipitated by potassium iodide ; ammonia and caustic alkalis render it green, and on heating convert it into the corresponding alkaline iodide and metallic mercury. The crystallized iodide is less sensitive to light than the precipitated yellow compound, which rapidly becomes black even in diffused daylight. When mercurous nitrate; solution is treated with bromine under similar conditions,...
Page 756 - ... (3) The bleaching solution must be exceedingly dilute, otherwise the action is so rapid and powerful, that both old and new •writings are removed almost simultaneously. (4) The action must be carefully watched so as not to be too long continued.
Page 222 - ... and insecticides, and in the textile industry as an assist in printing. All water- and acid-soluble compounds of arsenic are poisonous. Arsenious acid, arsenic trioxide, arsenious oxide, arsenious anhydride, or white arsenic, As2O3, is an anhydride which, dissolved in water, reacts as H3AsO3. It is only slightly soluble in cold water but more soluble in hot water, alkalies, alkaline carbonates, alcohol and some dilute acids. It occurs naturally in mineral form and is also recovered from arsenical...
Page 756 - ... as ordinary writing inks, prepared from iron and chromium salts and galls. 2. Writing dried by means of blotting paper is naturally more easily removed than writing which is allowed to dry on the surface of the paper; and light writing is somewhat more easily removed than coarse and heavy writing. 3. The bleaching solution must be exceedingly dilute, otherwise the action is so rapid and powerful that both old and new writings are removed almost simultaneously. 4. The action must be carefully...
Page 171 - Hourly determinations of the quantity of urine and the percentage of urea, extractives and total nitrogen contained therein, have been made by the authors for four consecutive days. The following are the conclusions : — 1. The greatest elimination of water takes place about one hour after a meal ; the greatest elimination of urea three to four hours after. '2. The excretion of water and nitrogen is much less during the night than during the day.
Page 72 - Band xxxiv, p. 78. •(•Quoted from HC Wood's Therapeutics, p. 161. small repeated doses of antimonious oxide are without influence on the excretion of nitrogen, sulphur, and phosphorus, and that hence when taken in non-toxic doses it has no noticeable action on proteid metabolism.* Without doubt, toxic doses do materially affect the nutrition of the body, but with a dog of 13 kilos. weight the administration of repeated doses of antimonious oxide, to the extent of 17 grains in 13 days, led...
Page 616 - Yonng. (Analyst, xiii. 5, 6.) The author confirms the statement of Yoshida as to the occurrence of a minute quantity of aluminium in wheat, and shows that practically the whole of it is associated with the gluten. A sample of the best Vienna flour gave 0'0075 per cent, of aluminium phosphate. The gluten from 250 grams of this flour was dissolved in acetic acid to purify it, and the solution yielded aluminium phosphate amounting to 0-0074 for 100 parts of flour.
Page 11 - ... they would cut the normal isochoric lines at an extremely high temperature. The physical meaning of this behaviour is that, if the temperature of a gas, at constant volume, be raised sufficiently high, the density must equal and then fall below the normal. It is evident that this must be the case. For the pressure of a gas depends on the number of molecules present in unit volume, on the average velocity of each molecule, and on the number of impacts on unit area of the surface of the containing...
Page 489 - In some oysters, which produced these symptoms, I have recently found tyrotoxicon. Milk or other fluid to be tested for this poison should be kept in well stoppered bottles ; for if the fluid be exposed to the air, the tyrotoxicon may decompose in a few hours. The filtrate from the milk or the filtered aqueous extract of cheese should be neutralized with sodium carbonate, then shaken with half its volume of pure ether.
Page 345 - ... as no sulphuretted hydrogen could be detected, we. infer the non-existence of sulphides in the nodule. The total mineral was also analyzed with the following results: Pet cent.

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