The Quarterly Review, Volume 43

Front Cover
William Gifford, Sir John Taylor Coleridge, John Gibson Lockhart, Whitwell Elwin, William Macpherson, William Smith, Sir John Murray IV, Rowland Edmund Prothero (Baron Ernle)
John Murray, 1830
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Page 494 - He that is down needs fear no fall, He that is low, no pride; He that is humble ever shall Have God to be his guide.
Page 213 - Ye hypocrites, ye can discern the face of the sky and of the earth; but how is it that ye do not discern this time? 57 Yea, and why even of yourselves judge ye not what is right?
Page 342 - I returned, and saw under the sun, that the race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, neither yet bread to the wise, nor yet riches to men of understanding, nor yet favour to men of skill; but time and chance happeneth to them all.
Page 362 - Then let him pass, a blessing on his head ! And, long as he can wander, let him breathe The freshness of the valleys ; let his blood Struggle with frosty air and winter snows ; And let the chartered wind that sweeps the heath Beat his grey locks against his withered face.
Page 346 - Committee of the House of Commons, appointed to inquire into the Bankrupt Laws ; and i This and the two preceding motions were lost by large majorities.
Page 192 - Origen* has with singular sagacity observed, that he who believes the Scripture to have proceeded from him who is the Author of Nature, may well expect to find the same sort of difficulties in it, as are found in the constitution of Nature.
Page 493 - A man i' the clouds, and hear him speak to thee ? Wouldst thou be in a dream, and yet not sleep ? Or wouldst thou in a moment laugh and weep ? Wouldest thou lose thyself and catch no harm, And find thyself again without a charm ? Wouldst read thyself, and read thou know'st not what, And yet know whether thou art blest or not, By reading the same lines ? O then come hither, And lay my book, thy head, and heart together.
Page 493 - Wouldst thou be pleasant, yet be far from folly ? Wouldst thou read riddles and their explanation ? Or else be drowned in thy contemplation ? Dost thou love picking meat ? Or wouldst thou see A man i...
Page 212 - Nature, meaning thereby the Law which human Nature knoweth itself in reason universally bound unto, which also for that cause may be termed most fitly the Law of Reason: this Law, I say...

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