Collected Papers of Sir James Dewar...

Front Cover
The University Press, 1927
 

Contents

On the Chemical Efficiency of Sunlight
54
Note on the Specific Heat of Hydrogenium
62
On the VapourDensity of Potassium
70
On the Spectra of Sodium and Potassium
71
Problems of Helium and Radium 1013
73
On the Spectra of certain Compounds of Carbon with Hydrogen
77
On the Action of Light on the Retina and other Tissues
80
On the Physiological Action of Light No III
86
APPENDIX
114
On the Physiological Action of Ozone
115
Preliminary Note on a New Method of obtaining Very Perfect
121
Farther Researches in Very Perfect Vacua
127
The Physiological Action of Light Part II
140
On Clapeyrons Formula
152
Preliminary Note on Experiments in ElectroPhotometry
159
On the Reversal of the Lines of Metallic Vapours
162
Studies on the Chinoline Series
164
On the Physical Constants of Hydrogenium Part II
169
Note on Electrolytic Experiments
170
On the Electrical Resistivity of Pure Mercury at the Tem
173
The Absorption of Hydrogen by Palladium at High Tem
188
The Specific Volumes of Oxygen and Nitrogen Vapour at
204
On the Critical Point of Mixed Vapours
209
On the Spectrum of Water I
217
On the Reversal of the Lines of Metallic Vapours VII
218
The Effect of LiquidAir Temperatures on the Mechanical
222
Recent Developments of the Theory of Dissociation
225
On the UltraViolet Spectra of the Elements
231
On the Atomic Weight of Manganese
234
Longperiod Determination of the Rate of Production
236
Note on the Order of the Reversibility of the Lithium Lines
240
Presidential Address to the British Association 753
243
Researches on Liquefied Gases
246
On Electric Resistance Thermometry at the Temperature
332
Magnetic Property of Liquid Oxygen
334
Note on the Spectra of the Flames of some Metallic Com
348
Trans Roy Soc Edin 1911 XLVII 737794
353
The Electrical Resistance of Metals and Alloys at Tempera
363
SUBJECT INDEX
375
Solidified Air
389
On the Refractive Indices of Liquid Nitrogen and Air
390
Note on the Viscosity of Solids
404
On the Liquefaction of Gases
414
The Variation in the Electrical Resistance of Bismuth when
444
On the Refraction and Dispersion of Liquid Oxygen and
452
On the Changes produced in Magnetized Iron and Steels
470
On the Electrical Resistivity of Bismuth at the Temperature
483
On the Magnetic Permeability and Hysteresis of Iron
491
On the Magnetic Permeability of Liquid Oxygen and Liquid
504
On the Dielectric Constant of Liquid Oxygen and Liquid Air
516
Properties of Liquid Oxygen
525
New LowTemperature Phenomena 892
528
Note on the Dielectric Constants of Ice and Alcohol at Very
536
On the Dielectric Constants of certain Frozen Electrolytes
550
On the ThermoElectric Junction as a Means of Determining
555
On the Dielectric Constants of Pure Ice Glycerin Nitrobenzol
566
On the Dielectric Constants of certain Organic Bodies at
579
On the Dielectric Constants of Metallic Oxides dissolved
588
Production of Solid Oxygen by the Evaporation of the Liquid 1077
589
Further Observations on the Dielectric Constants of Frozen
600
On the Properties of Liquid Fluorine
630
Liquid Oxygen in Warfare 1242
636
The Liquefaction of Air and the Detection of Impurities
639
Liquid Air as an Analytic Agent
644
On the Magnetic Susceptibility of Liquid Oxygen
659

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Page 310 - Particles, would not be of the same Nature and Texture now, with Water and Earth composed of entire Particles in the Beginning. And therefore that Nature may be lasting, the Changes of Corporeal Things are to be placed only in the various Separations and new Associations and Motions of these permanent Particles...
Page 466 - The above methods having failed to produce "static" hydrogen, Wroblewski suggested that the result might be attained by the use of hydrogen gas as a cooling agent. From this time until his death in the year 1888 Wroblewski devoted his time to a laborious research on the isothermals of hydrogen at low temperatures. The data thus arrived at enabled him, by the use of Van der Waal's formula}, to calculate the critical constants and boiling point of liquid hydrogen.
Page 310 - I had rather infer from their Cohesion, that their Particles attract one another by some force, which in immediate Contact is exceeding strong, at small distances performs the chymical Operations above mention'd, and reaches not far from the Particles with any sensible Effect There are therefore Agents in Nature able to make the Particles of Bodies stick together by very strong Attractions.
Page 163 - On filing off the end of the tube, its contents exploded and the oily matter vanished. Early next morning, Dr. Paris received the following note: Dear Sir — The oil you noticed yesterday turns out to be liquid chlorine. Yours faithfully, M. Faraday The gas had been liquefied by its own pressure.
Page 61 - that from the point (about 600°) at which the specific heat of carbon ceases to vary with increase of temperature, and becomes comparable with that of other elements...
Page 91 - A prepared daguerreotype plate is enclosed in a box filled with water, having a glass front with a shutter over it. Between this glass and the plate is a gridiron of silver wire ; the plate is connected...
Page 85 - ... got at a distance of one foot, whereas the electro-motive force, instead of being altered in the same proportion, is only reduced to one-third. Repeated experiments made with the eye in different positions have conclusively shown that a quantity of light one hundred times in excess of another quantity only modifies the electro-motive force to the extent of increasing it three times as much, certainly not more. 9. It was apparent that these experiments would ultimately bear upon the theory of...
Page 398 - ... another — that is to say, in contact ; and does not seem to provide for any considerable increase of attraction when the area of contact is increased, whether by pressing the bodies together, or by shaping them to fit over a large area. But if we take into account the heterogeneous distribution of density essential to any molecular theory of matter, we readily see that it alone is sufficient to intensify the force of gravitation between two bodies placed extremely close to one another, or between...
Page 53 - Foucalt's experiments that sunlight has 150 times the luminous intensity of the lime light ; so that we only require to calculate at what temperature this intensity is reached in order to get the solar temperature. This temperature is 16,000° C., in round numbers. Enormously high temperatures are not required, therefore, to produce great luminous intensities, and the temperature of the sun need not, at least, exceed the above number. Sir William Thomson, in his celebrated article, " On the Age of...
Page 163 - There can scarcely be a doubt entertained respecting the reducibility of all elastic fluids of whatever kind into liquids; and -we ought not to despair of effecting it in low temperatures, and by strong pressure exerted upon the unmixed gases.

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