Elementary lectures on artillery, by C.H. Owen and T.L. Dames

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Royal Artillery Institution, 1861 - 234 pages

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Page 88 - ... to the increase in length ; the velocities being in a ratio somewhat less than that of the square roots of the length of the bore, but greater than that of the cube root* of the same, and is indeed nearly in the middle ratio between the two.
Page 66 - The detonator is then instantly pierced by the point and is thus fired. The flame thus produced passes into an annular space, formed within the revolving cover, which rests on the upper surface of the fuze composition, and from this annular space it is directed outwards through an opening so as to impinge on and to ignite the fuze composition at any required part of the circle. The fuze thus ignited burns in both directions, but only takes effect at one extremity, when it communicates with a small...
Page 66 - ... at any required part of the circle. The fuze, thus ignited, burns in both directions, but only takes effect at one extremity, where it communicates with a small magazine of powder in the centre. The fuze is surrounded by a scale-paper, graduated to accord with the elevation of the gun, so that when the range of a distant object is found by trial, it is only necessary to turn the igniting aperture of the cover to the point on the fuze-scale corresponding with the degrees and minutes of elevation...
Page 88 - ... part more range for a double length of gun. From the same table it also appears that the time of the ball's flight is nearly as the range ; the gun and elevation being the same.
Page 121 - I have found to be about 6°. This appears at first very paradoxical, but it may be easily explained. The elongated shot, if properly formed and having a sufficient rotation, retains the same inclination to the horizontal plane throughout its flight, and consequently acquires a continually increasing obliquity to the curve of its flight. Now the effect of this obliquity is, that the projectile is in a measure sustained upon the air, just as a kite is supported by the current of air meeting the inclined...
Page 152 - I shall therefore close this paper with predicting, that whatever State shall thoroughly comprehend the nature and advantages of rifled barrel pieces, and, having facilitated and completed their construction, shall introduce into their armies their general use with a dexterity in the management of them ; they will by this means acquire a superiority, which will almost equal...
Page 88 - ... by further increasing the charge, the velocity gradually diminishes, till the bore is quite full of powder. That this charge for th,e greatest velocity is greater as the gun is longer, but yet not greater in so high a proportion as the length of the gun is ; so that...
Page 88 - It appears, again, from the table of ranges, that the range increases in a much lower ratio than the velocity, the gun and elevation being the same. And when this is compared with the proportion of the velocity and length of the gun...

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