Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Volume 33

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Priestley and Weale, 1873
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Includes lists of additions to the Society's library, usually separately paged.
 

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Page 542 - ... when the novelty of the subject is considered, we cannot be surprised that many things, formerly taken for granted, should on examination prove to be different from what they were generally but incautiously supposed to be. For instance, an equal scattering of the stars may be admitted in certain calculations ; but when we examine the Milky Way, or the closely- compressed clusters of stars, this supposed equality of scattering must be given up.
Page 191 - In entering this observation in the Obituary of the Astronomical Society, the distinguished Secretary naturally regarded Mrs. Somerville's early training from the point of view of the gains and losses of Science. Readers of the book before us will probably be tempted rather to consider it from that...
Page 49 - And afterwards they fell from the sky in such numbers, and so thickly together, that as they descended low in the air, they seemed large and fiery, and the sky and the air seemed to be in flames, and even the earth appeared as if ready to take fire.
Page 27 - Verification and Extension of La Caille's Arc of Meridian at the Cape of Good Hope, by Sir Thomas Maclear, Astronomer Royal at the Cape of Good Hope.
Page 404 - Chron., Th. 1, S. 164. This must be the first annular eclipse in England, of which we have any record. 795. "In this year the Moon was eclipsed between cockcrowing and dawn on the Vth of the Kal. of April; and Eardwulf succeeded to the kingdom of the Northumbrians on the Ilnd of the Ides of May.
Page 201 - In 1851, the Council of the Geological Society awarded to Professor Sedgwick the Wollaston Palladium Medal " for his original researches in developing the geological structure of the British Isles, of the Alps, and of the Rhenish Provinces.
Page 239 - ... apparent motions at right angles to the line of sight and the radial motions as discovered by the spectroscope, still it is interesting to remark that in the case of the stars Castor and Pollux, one of which is approaching and the other receding, their proper motions also are different in direction and in amount ; and further, that y Leonis, which has an opposite radial motion to a and /3 of the same constellation, differs from these stars in the direction of its proper motion.
Page 270 - The most northerly stations are to be found in Siberia, Tartary, and Thibet (which will scarcely be visited by astronomers in December), on the coasts of China, and in North British India.
Page 541 - I must freely confess that by continuing my sweeps of the heavens, my opinion of the arrangement of the stars and their magnitudes, and of some other particulars, has undergone a gradual change ; and, indeed, when the novelty of the subject is considered, we cannot be surprised that many things, formerly taken for granted, should on examination prove to be different from what they were generally but incautiously supposed to be. For instance, an equal scattering of the stars...
Page 116 - I had no time to spare to look for the other comet, and the next morning the clouds and rain had returned. " If I get another view before posting this, I may be able to add a hasty postscript. The positions, the first rough, the second pretty fair, from the two known stars, are — Madras MTRA (Apparent) PD hm 8 Ii rn K °

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