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" Coloured fluids, such as black and red ink, though equally homogeneous, stop or absorb different kinds of rays, and when exposed to the sun they become heated in different degrees ; while pure water seems to transmit all the rays equally, and scarcely... "
Optics: Light and Sight Theoretically and Practically Considered, with Their ... - Page 71
by Edward Nugent - 1870 - 268 pages
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A Treatise on Optics...: First American Edition, with an Appendix ...

David Brewster, Alexander Dallas Bache - 1833 - 95 pages
...portion, is absorbed, or stopped by the particles of the body. Colored fluids, such as black and red ink, though equally homogeneous, stop or absorb different...the sun. When we examine more minutely the action of colored glasses and colored fluids in absorbing light, many remarkable phenomena present themselves,...
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On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences

Mary Somerville - 1834 - 666 pages
...white light and transmitting others; as, for example, black and red ink, though equally homogeneous, absorb different kinds of rays; and when exposed to...different degrees, while pure water seems to transmit all rays equally, and is not sensibly heated by the passing light of the sun. The rich dark light transmitted...
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The Connection of the Physical Sciences

Mary Somerville - 1834 - 356 pages
...white light and transmitting others ; as, for example, black and red ink, though equally homogenous, absorb different kinds of rays; and when exposed to...different degrees, while pure water Se-ems to transmit all rays equally, and is not sensibly heated by the passing light of the sun. The rich dark light transmitted...
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Recreations in mathematics and natural philosophy, recomposed by m. Montucla ...

Jacques Ozanam - 1840
...portion, is absorbed, or stopped by the particles of the hody. Coloured fluids, such as black and red ink, though equally homogeneous, stop or absorb different...scarcely receives any heat from the passing light of t he sun. " When we examine more minutely the action of coloured fluids in absorbing light, many remarkable...
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A Treatise on Optics

David Brewster - 1841 - 418 pages
...portion, is absorbed, or stopped by the particles of the body. Colored fluids, such as black and red ink, though equally homogeneous, stop or absorb different...the sun. When we examine more minutely the action of colored glasses and colored fluids in absorbing light, many remarkable phenomena present themselves,...
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The Magazine of Science, and Schools of Art, Volume 2

1841
...inks, though equally homogeneous, absorb different kinds of rays ; and when exposed to the sun, tbey become heated in different degrees ; while pure water seems to transmit all rays equally, and is not sensibly heated by the passing light of the sun. The rich dark light transmitted...
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On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences

Mary Somerville - 1849 - 524 pages
...white light, and transmitting others. As for example, black and red inks, though equally homogeneous, absorb different kinds of rays ; and, when exposed...different degrees ; while pure water seems to transmit all rays equally, and is not sensibly heated by the passing light of the sun. The rich dark light transmitted...
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Suggestive Hints Towards Improved Secular Instruction: Making it Bear Upon ...

Richard Dawes - 1849 - 184 pages
...in different degrees from their absorbing the light which falls upon them, and consequently the heat in different degrees ; while pure water seems to transmit all the rays equally, and is not sensibly heated by the passing light of the sun. The teacher should also note the difference...
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Suggestive Hints Towards Improved Secular Instruction: Making it Bear Upon ...

Richard Dawes - 1857 - 220 pages
...in different degrees from their absorbing the light which falls upon them, and consequently the heat in different degrees ; while pure water seems to transmit all the rays equally, and is not sensibly heated by the passing light of the sun. The teacher should also note the difference...
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Studies in English prose: specimens, with notes, by J. Payne

Joseph Payne - 1868
...white light, and transmitting others. As, for example, black and red inks, though equally homogeneous, absorb different kinds of rays ; and, when exposed to the sun, they become heated in different decrees ; while pure water seems to transmit all rays equally, and is not sensibly heated by the passing...
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