Proceedings of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Volume 33

Front Cover
1885
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Contents

On the colors of variable stars By S C CHANDLER
59
On the general values of the obliquity of the ecliptic and of the precession
67
On the measurement of an international arc of meridian through the Ameri
76
The nebulæ By LEWIS SWIFT
81
Title
82
ADDRESS OF VICE PRESIDENT JOHN TROWBRIDGE
97
Relation between the electromotive force of a Daniell cell and the strength
109
Determination of the coefficient of expansion of the speculum metal used
116
A possible method of electrical communication between vessels at sea
132
On the sensitiveness of the eye to colors of a low degree of saturation
138
ADDRESS OF VICEPRESIDENT JOHN
163
Continuous etherification By L M NORTON and C O PRESCOTT
170
Fermentation without combined nitrogen By ALFRED SPRINGER
174
An explanation of Gladstone and Tribes 23 law in chemical dynamics
185
The density of solid carbonic acid By JAMES DEWAR
198
78
202
97
214
On the chemistry of fish By W O ATWATER
217
Modifications of Ruffles Method for the absolute determination of nitrogen
224
ADDRESS OF VICE PRESIDENT ROBERT H THURSTON
255
Electric tramways By M HOLROYD SMITH
261
On a new method of producing screws of standard length and uniform pitch
275
Development of the philosophy of heat engines By R H THURSTON
296
ADDRESS OF VICE PRESIDENT N H WINCHELL
394
The correlation of the lower coal measures of Ohio and eastern Kentucky
398
An attempt to determine the amount of chemical erosion taking place in
404
Notice on the microscopical examination of a series of ocean lake river
413
Note on the Eurypteridæ of the Devonian and carboniferous formations
420
Geographic classification illustrated by a study of plains plateaus and their
428
The ultimate results of converting the basin of Sahar into an inland lake
443

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Page xxiii - The objects of the Association are, by periodical and migratory meetings, to promote intercourse between those who are cultivating science in different parts of America, to give a stronger and more general impnlse and more systematic direction to scientific research, and to procure for the labors of scientific men Increased facilities and a wider usefulness.
Page 637 - Whereas it is necessary for the support of government, for the discharge of the debts of the United States, and the encouragement and protection of manufactures, that duties be laid on goods, wares, and merchandises imported: Be it enacted, etc.
Page 20 - ... there is no reason to deny the final cessation of the sun's activity, and the consequent death of the system. But while this hypothesis seems fairly to meet the requirements of the case, and to be a necessary consequence of the best knowledge we can obtain as to the genesis of our system and the constitution of the sun itself, it must, of course, be conceded that it does not yet admit of any observational verification. N"o measurements within our power can test it, so far as appears at present.
Page 132 - I described a modification of amethod of tracing equi-potential lines and surfaces employed by Prof. WG Adams2 and other observers. The chief point of difference lay in the use of a telephone in place of a galvanometer, and in the employment of a rheotome, to interrupt the battery circuit with great rapidity.
Page 146 - ... and that the same property, under different modifications, was the cause of all the phenomena exhibited by different voltaic combinations.
Page 170 - Wesleyan University, Middletown, Conn. [ABSTRACT.] THIS paper gives a brief account of the progress of an investigation of the chemical composition and nutritive values of American food-fishes and invertebrates, which is being conducted in the laboratory of Wesleyan University under the auspices of the Smithsonian Institution and the United States Fish Commission, and of which brief accounts were presented at the Boston and Cincinnati meetings of the Association. In its present status the investigation...
Page 588 - His structural superiority consists solely in the complexity and size of the brain. A very important lesson is derived from these and kindred facts. The monkeys were anticipated in the greater fields of the world's activity by more powerful rivals. The ancestors of the ungulates held the fields and the swamps, and the carnivora, driven by hunger, learned the arts and cruelties of the chase. The weaker ancestors of the quadrumana possessed neither speed nor weapons of...
Page 17 - sunspottist" myself, and am doubtful whether the terrestrial influence of sun-spots amounts to anything worth speaking of, except in the direction of magnetism. But all must concede that this is by no means yet demonstrated (it is not easy to prove a negative) ; and there certainly are facts and presumptions enough tending the other way to warrant more extended investigation of the subject. The investigation is embarrassed by the circumstance, pointed out by Dr. Gould, that the effects of sun-spot...
Page 698 - ... exhibitors, and to the efficient committeemen and aids who have made it the admirable success it has proved itself to be. Secondly : with the same or a still greater sense of obligation, we may say still more, if possible, of the exhibition of microscopes and microscopic objects which will be offered to us by the Biological and Microscopical Section of the Academy of Natural Sciences, in the foyer or upper hall, to-night.
Page 461 - If true, this is an ultimate fact, neither more nor less difficult to comprehend than ttie nature of energy or matter in their ultimate analyses. But how is such an hypothesis to be reconciled with the facts of nature, where consciousness plays a part so infinitesimally small ? The explanation lies close at hand, and has already been referred to. Energy become automatic is no longer conscious, or is about to become unconscious.

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