Theories of solutions

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Yale University Press, 1912 - 247 pages
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Page 35 - I became convinced that different gases have not their particles of the same size; and that the following may be adopted as a maxim, till some reason appears to the contrary: namely, — That every species of pure elastic fluid has its particles globular and all of a size; but that no two species agree in the size of their particles, the pressure and temperature being, the same.
Page vii - In the year 1883 a legacy of eighty thousand dollars was left to the President and Fellows of Yale College in the city of New Haven, to be held in trust, as a gift from her children, in memory of their beloved and honored mother, Mrs. Hepsa Ely Silliman. On this foundation Yale College was requested and directed to establish an annual course of lectures designed to illustrate the presence and providence, the wisdom and goodness of God, as manifested in the natural and moral world. These were to be...
Page ii - STELLAR MOTIONS. With Special Reference to Motions Determined by Means of the Spectrograph. By WILLIAM WALLACE CAMPBELL...
Page 78 - The solution of a solid in a liquid would accordingly be analogous to the sublimation of such a solid into a gas, and proceeds from the intermixture of molecules detached from the solid with those of the surrounding liquid. Such a process is promoted by rise of temperature, partly because the molecules of the still solid substance make longer excursions from their normal centre, partly because they are subjected to more violent encounter with the moving molecules of liquid ' (
Page ii - STELLAR MOTIONS. WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO MOTIONS DETERMINED BY MEANS OF THE SPECTROGRAPH. By WILLIAM WALLACE CAMPBELL, SC.D., LL.D., Director of the Lick Observatory, University of California.
Page vii - THE SILLIMAN FOUNDATION IN the year 1883 a legacy of eighty thousand dollars was left to the President and Fellows of Yale College in the city of New Haven, to be held in trust, as a gift from her children, in memory of their beloved and honored mother, Mrs. Hepsa Ely Silliman.
Page 2 - We believe from observation that water becomes stone and earth by condensation, and wind and air by subdivision ; ignited air becomes fire, but this, when condensed and extinguished, again takes the form of air, and the latter is then transformed to mist, which resolves into water. Lastly, rocks and earth are produced from water.
Page 35 - The truth is, I believe, that gases do not unite in equal or exact measures in any one instance; when they appear to do so, it is owing to the inaccuracy of our experiments. In no case, perhaps, is there a nearer approach to mathematical exactness, than in that of one measure of oxygen to two of hydrogen; but here, the most exact experiments I have ever made gave rgj hydrogen to 1 oxygen.
Page 35 - In no case, perhaps, is there a nearer approach to mathematical exactness, than in that of 1 measure of oxygen to 2 of hydrogen ; but here the most exact experiments I have ever made, gave 1.97 hydrogen to 1 oxygen.
Page 35 - ... having the same weight as the two original measures; but the number of ultimate particles could at most be one half of that before the union. No two elastic fluids, probably, therefore, have the same number of particles, either in the same volume or the same weight.

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