Encyclopædia metropolitana; or, Universal dictionary of knowledge, ed. by E. Smedley, Hugh J. Rose and Henry J. Rose. [With] Plates, Volume 4

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1845
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Page 323 - It seems possible to account for all the phenomena of heat, if it be supposed that in solids the particles are in a constant state of vibratory motion, the particles of the hottest bodies moving with the greatest velocity...
Page 323 - ... substances the particles move round their own axes, and separate from each other, penetrating in right lines through space. Temperature may be conceived to depend upon the velocities of the vibrations; increase of capacity on the motion being performed in greater space ; and the diminution of temperature during the conversion of solids into fluids or gases, may be explained on the idea of the loss of vibratory motion, in consequence of the revolution of particles round their axes, at the moment...
Page 322 - The immediate cause of the phenomenon of heat, then, is motion ; and the laws of its communication are precisely the same as the laws of the communication of motion.
Page 195 - I coated several wires in the same manner, and found that when sparks from the conductors before mentioned were made to pass through water by means of a point so guarded, a spark passing to the distance of one-eighth of an inch would decompose water, when the point exposed did not exceed T1§w of an inch in diameter. With another point...
Page 331 - The vessels in which the freezing mixture is made should be very thin, and just large enough to hold it, and the materials should be mixed together as quickly as possible.
Page 193 - Under these circumstances, a vivid action was soon observed to take place. The potash began to fuse at both its points of electrization. There was a violent effervescence at the upper surface : at the lower or negative surface, there was no liberation of elastic fluid; but small globules, having a high metallic lustre, and being precisely similar, in visible characters to quicksilver, appeared ; some of which burnt with explosion, and bright flame, as soon as they were formed, and others remained,...
Page 176 - ... the distance at which the discharge took place increased as the exhaustion was made, and when the atmosphere in the vessel supported only one-fourth of an inch of mercury in the barometrical...
Page 45 - Chance has thrown in my way another Principle, more universal and remarkable . . . and which casts a new Light on the Subject of Electricity. This Principle is, that there are two distinct Electricities, very different from one another; one of which I call vitreous Electricity and the other resinous Electricity.
Page 125 - THE electric organs of the torpedo are placed on each side of the cranium and gills, reaching from thence to the semicircular cartilages of each great fin, and extending longitudinally from the anterior extremity of the animal to the transverse cartilage, which divides the thorax from the abdomen...
Page 424 - The colours thus communicated by the different bases to flame afford, in many cases, a ready and neat way of detecting extremely minute Quantities of them...

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