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Page 32 - But if the knowledge of the doctrines unfolded by science is pleasing, so is the being able to trace the steps by which those doctrines are investigated, and their truth demonstrated: indeed, you cannot be said, in any sense of the word, to have learnt them, or to know them, if you have not so studied them as to perceive how they are proved. Without this you never can expect to remember them long, or to understand them accurately; and that would of itself be reason enough for examining closely the...
Page 31 - To learn these things, and to reflect upon them, occupies the faculties, fills the mind, and produces certain as well as pure gratification. But if the knowledge of the doctrines unfolded by science is pleasing, so is the being able to trace the steps by which those doctrines are investigated, and their truth demonstrated: indeed you cannot be said, in any sense of the word, to have learnt them, or to know them, if you have not so studied them as to perceive how they are proved. Without this you...
Page 218 - These simple machines are the lever, the wheel and axle, the pulley, the inclined plane, the wedge, and the screw.
Page 32 - Without this you never can expect to remember them long, or to understand them accurately ; and that would of itself be reason enough for examining closely the grounds they rest on. But there is the highest gratification of all, in being able to see distinctly those grounds, so as to be satisfied that a belief in the doctrines is well founded. Hence, to follow a demonstration of a grand mathematical truth...
Page 96 - Windsor, as a fact which he could personally testify, having occurred in a village where he resided several years, and where he actually was at the time it took place. The blacksmith of the village had got hold of Richardson's novel of ' Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded,' and used to read it aloud in the long summer evenings, seated on his anvil, and never failed to have a large and attentive audience. It is a pretty longwinded book ; but their patience was fully a match for the author's prolixity, and...
Page 126 - The formation of these collections is shared equally (as far as the labor is in question) by all. It is the result of the active and unceasing research in which the Town Lyceums especially are engaged. Thousands of children, of not more than eight or ten years old know now more of geology, mineralogy, botany, statistical facts, &c., — in fine, of what immediately concerns their daily interests and occupations, — than was probably known thirty years ago by any five individuals in the United States....
Page 59 - ... books at Haddington to subscribers have, on an average of the last two years, been nearly eight and a half times per annum for each volume : the gratuitous issues at Haddington, Gifford, Salton, Aberlady, North Berwick, Belhaven, and Spott have been seven times for each volume ; and...
Page 32 - Hence to follow a demonstration of a grand mathematical truth — to perceive how clearly and how inevitably one step succeeds another, and how the whole steps lead to the conclusion — to observe how certainly and unerringly the reasoning goes on from things perfectly self-evident, and by the smallest addition at each step, every one being as easily taken after the one before, as the first step of all was ; and yet the result being something not only far from self-evident, but so general and strange,...
Page 93 - ... filled up — when the mind enjoys relief from its occupations, I say, that relief must come in the shape of something cheering and exhilarating. The man cannot sit down dull and stupid — and he ought not. Now suppose that society provides him with no cheerful or attractive recreations, that society, in fact, frowns upon all amusements ; that the importunate spirit in business, and the sanctimonious spirit in religion, and the supercilious spirit in fashion, all unite to discountenance popular...
Page 89 - ... beneficial objects, to become a spring of happiness ; but gratified to a certain moderate extent it must be, in the case of every man, if we desire him to be either a useful, active, or contented member of society. Now I would ask, what provision do we find for the cheap and innocent and daily amusements of the mass of the labouring population of this country ? What sort of resources have they to call up the cheerfulness of their spirits, and chase away the cloud from their brow after the fatigue...

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