English Trees & Tree Planting

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Page 371 - By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion. We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof. For there they that carried us away captive required of us a song ; and they that wasted us required of us mirth, saying, Sing us one of the songs of Zion.
Page 141 - Behold, the Assyrian was a cedar in Lebanon with fair branches, VOL. III. K and with a shadowing shroud, and of an high stature ; and his top was among the thick boughs.
Page 66 - When in one night, ere glimpse of morn, His shadowy flail hath threshed the corn That ten day-labourers could not end, Then lies him down, the lubber fiend, And, stretched out all the chimney's length, Basks at the fire his hairy strength; And crop-full out of doors he flings, Ere the first cock his matin rings.
Page 277 - Pepino ! old trees in their living state are the only things that money cannot command. Rivers leave their beds, run into cities, and traverse mountains for it ; obelisks and arches, palaces and temples, amphitheatres and pyramids, rise up like exhalations at its bidding; even the free spirit of Man, the only thing great on earth, crouches and cowers in its presence . . . it passes away and vanishes before venerable trees. What a sweet odour is there ! whence comes it ? sweeter it appears to me and...
Page 117 - The fig-tree, not that kind for fruit renown'd, But such as, at this day, to Indians known; In Malabar or Decan spreads her arms, Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs take root, and daughters grow About the mother tree, a pillar'd shade, High overarch'd, and echoing walks between : There oft the Indian herdsman, shunning heat, Shelters in cool, and tends his pasturing herds At loop-holes cut through thickest shade...
Page 357 - Is there under Heaven a more glorious and refreshing object of the kind, than an impregnable hedge of about four hundred feet in length, nine feet high, and five in diameter, which I can show in my now ruined gardens at Say's Court, at any time of the year, glittering with its armed and varnished leaves ? The taller standards at orderly distances, blushing with their natural coral.
Page 326 - This more delusive, not the touch, but taste Deceived; they, fondly thinking to allay Their appetite with gust, instead of fruit Chew'd bitter ashes, which the offended taste With spattering noise rejected : oft they...
Page 118 - Some on the lower boughs, which crost their way, Fixing their bearded fibres, round and round, With many a ring and wild contortion wound; Some to the passing wind, at times, with sway Of gentle motion swung; Others of younger growth, unmov'd, were hung Like stone-drops from the cavern's fretted height.
Page 149 - Then anon the air began to wax clear and the sun to shine fair and bright, the which was right in the Frenchmen's eyes and on the Englishmen's backs. When the Genoese were assembled together and began to approach, they made a great leap and cry to abash the Englishmen, but they stood still and stirred not for all that.
Page 149 - English archers stept forth one pace and let fly their arrows so wholly and so thick that it seemed snow ; when the Genoese felt the arrows piercing through heads, arms, and breasts, many of them cast down their cross-bows and did cut their strings, and returned discomfited. When the French king saw them fly away, he said, ' Slay these rascals, for they shall let and trouble us without reason...

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