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" ... while it is supported by either parts or spirit, it will be seldom heartily abhorred. The Roman tyrant was content to be hated, if he was but feared; and there are thousands of the readers of romances willing to be thought wicked, if they may be allowed... "
Encyclopaedia Britannica; Or A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and ... - Page 75
1823
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Sunday School Teachers' Magazine, and Journal of Education

1813 - 1406 pages
...is the highest proof of understanding, and tho only solid basis of greatness ; and that vice is tho natural consequence of narrow thoughts; that it begins in mistake, and ends iu ignominy. EPITAPHS. An epitaph must be made fit for the person for whom it is made ; for a man to...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.

Samuel Johnson - 1840
...Romances willing to be thought wicked, if they may be allowed to be wits. It is therefore to be steadily inculcated, that virtue is the highest proof of understanding, and the only solid basis uf greatness ; and that vice is the natural consequence of narrow thoughts ; that it begins in mistake,...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: With an Essay on His Life and ..., Volume 1

Samuel Johnson, Arthur Murphy - 1843
...Romances willing to be thought wicked, if they may be allowed to be wits. It is therefore to be steadily inculcated, that virtue is the highest proof of understanding, and the only solid basis of greatness ; and that »ice U the natural consequence of narrow thoughts ; that it begins in mistake, and ends in ignominy.*...
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Maxims for meditation, conceits for conversation, gems of genius, pearls of ...

Maxims - 1852
...rather than doing well : but their manners ought to be the great concern. It ought always to be steadily inculcated, that virtue is the highest proof of understanding,...; that it begins in mistake, and ends in ignominy. T.CIW, hearing a young man speak too freely, told him, for this reason we have two ears, and but one...
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The Bunch of Keys

1861
...will more than repay for all your toil. JK NOTES FEOM MY SCRAP-BOOK. IT ought always to be steadily inculcated that virtue is the highest proof of understanding,...; that it begins in mistake and ends in ignominy. No habit is more difficultly acquired than that of acknowledging our errors ; and yet this habit is...
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The Revised Lesson Book for Standard I(-vi) of the Revised Code of the ...

Great Britain. Committee on Education - 1864
...widow became Mrs. 1'iozzi, and died at an advanced age. APOPHTHEGMS. IT ought always to be steadily inculcated, that virtue is the highest proof of understanding,...the natural consequence of narrow thoughts ; that it iegins in mistake, and ends in ignominy. No habit is acquired with more difficulty than that of acknowledging...
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John Heywood's Manchester readers. [With] Key, pt.1,2, Book 5

John Heywood (ltd.) - 1871
...at£5.56s. 11 jjd. (6) 827 at£9. 19s. IJd. Exercise in Dictation— II. It ought always to be steadily inculcated that virtue is the highest proof of understanding,...consequence of narrow thoughts ; that it begins in a mistake and ends in ignominy. Drawing Copy— I. Application of GeometryTrefoil In Gothic Tracery....
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Thaddeus of Warsaw

Jane Porter - 1880 - 478 pages
...wonderful and wild, or of gentlest beauty ! " and on these grounds I have steadily attempted to inculcate "that virtue is the highest proof of understanding, and the only solid basis of greatness ; that vice is the natural consequence of grovelling thoughts, which begin in mistake and end in ignominy."...
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Johnson: His Characteristics and Aphorisms

James Hay - 1884 - 181 pages
...useless to a man Ventas ^o knew he was not a liar, when he was sober. — Piozzi's Anecdotes, page 261. Virtue is the highest proof of understanding, and the only solid basis of greatness. — Rambler, No. 4. All that virtue can afford is quietness of conscience, a steady prospect of a happier...
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Wit and Wisdom of Samuel Johnson, Volume 1

Samuel Johnson - 1888 - 360 pages
...romances willing to be thought wicked if they may be allowed to be wits. It is therefore to be steadily inculcated, that virtue is the highest proof of understanding...; that it begins in mistake and ends in ignominy. Rambler, No. 4. Oats: A GRAIN which in England is generally given to horses, but in Scotland supports...
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