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" The virtue, spirit, and essence of a House of Commons consists in its being the express image of the feelings of the nation. It was not instituted to be a control upon the people, as of late it has been taught, by a doctrine of the most pernicious tendency.... "
The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal - Page 284
1827
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The Political Philosophy of Burke

John MacCunn - 1913 - 290 pages
...of a brief for his own constituents. Yet it is not unreasonable. To borrow words of Burke's own : ' The virtue, spirit, and essence of a House of Commons consists in its being the express image of the feelings of the nation.'1 And ceteris paribus, it is always an advantage that...
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A Plea for Parliamentary Government

Edward Melland - 1919 - 42 pages
...be complete and Bureaucracy will not be absolutely dead. Burke's words are as true now as ever: — The virtue, spirit and essence of a House of Commons consists in its being the express image of the feelings of the nation. ... It was not instituted to be a control upon the people...
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The State and the Church

Moorhouse F. X. Millar, Moorhouse I. X. Millar - 1922 - 358 pages
...T Ibid., p. 66. Burke in his ' ' Thoughts on the Cause of the Present Piscontents," 1770, had said: "The virtue, spirit, and essence of a House of Commons consists in its being the express image of the feelings of tta nation. It was not instituted to be a control upon the people,...
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The Irresistible Movement of Democracy

John Simpson Penman - 1923 - 754 pages
...acceptable to the people, or while factions predominated in the Court in which the nation had no confidence. "The virtue, spirit, and essence of a House of Commons consists in its being the express image of the feelings of the nation. It was not instituted to be a control upon the people,...
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A Survey of English Literature: 1730-1780

Oliver Elton - 1928 - 412 pages
...divine authority, yet its forms, and the persons who administer it, all originate from the people. . . . The virtue, spirit, and essence of a House of Commons consists in its being an express image of the feelings of the nation. It was not instituted to be a control upon the people,...
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International Journal of Ethics, Volume 34

1924 - 428 pages
...in the body of the people. It is the same principle which Burke eloquently expressed when he said: "The virtue, spirit, and essence of a House of Commons consists in its being the express image of the feelings of a nation." Manifestly, the first step in securing such a principle...
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The Concept of Representation

Hanna F. Pitkin - 1967 - 340 pages
...of Commons shall be made to bear some stamp of the actual disposition of the people at large. . . . The virtue, spirit and essence of a House of Commons consists in its being the express image of the feelings of the nation.71 It is always "sentiment" or popular "feelings" that...
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Pre-Revolutionary Writings

Edmund Burke - 1993 - 412 pages
...distinction of a popular representative. This belongs equally to all parts of Government, and in all forms. The virtue, spirit, and essence of a House of Commons consists in its being the express image 91 of the feelings of the nation. It was not instituted to be a controul upon the people,...
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The Useful Cobbler: Edmund Burke and the Politics of Progress

James Conniff - 1994 - 384 pages
...fancy and Caprice." 68 In addition, the Commons ought, in Burke's opinion, to be close to the people: "the virtue, spirit, and essence of a House of Commons consists in its being the express image of the feelings of the nation. It was not instituted to be a control upon the people,...
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Edmund Burke: Selected Writings and Speeches

Edmund Burke - 1997 - 720 pages
...distinction of a popular representative. This belongs equally to all parts of government and in all forms. The virtue, spirit, and essence of a House of Commons consists in its being the express image of the feelings of the nation. It was not instituted to be a control upon the people,...
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