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" I cannot say he is everywhere alike ; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat, insipid — his comic wit degenerating into clenches, his serious swelling into bombast. But he is always great... "
The Eclectic review. vol. 1-New [8th] - Page 548
1809
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The English Instructor: Being a Collection of Pieces in Prose, Selected from ...

1830 - 288 pages
...so4, I should do him " injury to compare him to the greatest of " mankind. He is many times flat and insipid; " his comic wit degenerating into clenches;...swelling into bombast. But he is " always great when sonae great occasion is pre" sentedto him. " Great he may be justly called, as the extent and force...
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The plays and poems of Shakspeare [according to the text of E ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1832 - 364 pages
...greatest of mankind. He is many times flat and insipid ; his comic wit degenerating into clenches, bis serious swelling into bombast. But he is always great,...himself as high above the rest of poets, Quantum lenta solent inter riburaa cupressi.' It is to be lamented, that such a writer should want a commentary ;...
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Some Account of the English Stage: From the Restoration in 1660 to ..., Volume 1

John Genest - 1832 - 656 pages
...where alike; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind — he is many times flat, insipid ; his comic wit degenerating...he ever had a fit subject for his wit, and did not raise himself, as high above the rest of poets — " Quantum lenta solent inter viburna cupressi" If...
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The Book of Versions; Or, Guide to French Translation: With Notes, to Assist ...

J. Cherpilloud - 1833 - 272 pages
...him injury to compare him", even with the* greatest of mankind. He is sometimes flat* and insipid : but he is always great, when some great* occasion is presented to him* ; no man * can say, he ever hadc a subject fit for his genius, and did not then raise himselfA above all other poets. — DRYDEN....
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Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres ...: To which are Added, Copious ...

Hugh Blair - 1833 - 654 pages
...he so, I should do him injury, to compare him to the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat and insipid; his comic wit degenerating into clenches;...swelling into bombast. But he is always great, when •ome great occasion is presented to him. 1 DRYDEH'S Essay on Dramatic Poetrj I when we would least...
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The Shipley Collection of Scientific Papers, Volume 293

1921 - 472 pages
...sense an idolater, as witness the following passage: "I cannot say he is everywhere alike. ... He is many times flat, insipid; his comic wit degenerating...into clenches, his serious swelling into bombast." (Pp. 47-48.) "Shakespeare's language is likewise a little obsolete." A little later, in 1674, Edward...
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The Works of John Dryden: In Verse and Prose, with a Life, Volume 2

John Dryden, John Mitford - 1836 - 488 pages
...everywhere alike ; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat, insipid; his comic wit degenerating...himself as high above the rest of poets, Quantum lenta solent inter vlburna cupressi. The consideration of this made Mr. Hales of Eton* say, that there was...
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The Young Lady's Book of Elegant Prose: Comprising Selections from the Works ...

1836 - 342 pages
...everywhere alike ; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat, insipid ; his comic wit degenerating...wit, and did not then raise himself as high above tiie rest of the poets. — Quantum tenta soient inter viburna capitU. The consideration of this made...
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The Elements of English Composition

David Irving - 1836 - 432 pages
...him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat, insipid ; his comick wit degenerating into clenches, his serious swelling...great, when some great occasion is presented to him. * * * As for Johnson, to whose character I am now arriv'd, if we look upon him while he was himself...
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A Practical System of Rhetoric; Or, The Principles and Rules of Style ...

Samuel Phillips Newman - 1837 - 334 pages
...where alike; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat, insipid; his comic wit degenerating...him; no man can say he ever had a fit subject for wit, and did not raise himself as high above the rest of poets, ' Quantum lenta solent inter viburna...
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