Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" I cannot say he is everywhere alike ; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat, insipid — his comic wit degenerating into clenches, his serious swelling into bombast. But he is always great... "
The Eclectic review. vol. 1-New [8th] - Page 548
1809
Full view - About this book

The Works of John Dryden: In Verse and Prose, with a Life, Volume 2

John Dryden, John Mitford - 1844 - 536 pages
...everywhere alike ; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat, insipid; his comic wit degenerating into clenches, his serious swelling into homhast. But he is always great, when some great occasion is presented to him: no man can say, he ever...
Full view - About this book

Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 57

1845 - 816 pages
...he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat and insipid ; his comic wit degenerating into clenches...high above the rest of poets, * Quantum lenta soient inter viburnacupresbi.' " The consideration of this made Mr Hales of Eton say, that there was no subject...
Full view - About this book

Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 57

1845 - 842 pages
...he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat and insipid ; his comic wit degenerating into clenches...himself as high above the rest of poets, ' Quantum lenta solent inter viburnacupressi.' " The consideration of this made Mr Hales of Eton say, that there was...
Full view - About this book

Literary Criticism: Plato to Dryden

Allan H. Gilbert - 1967 - 724 pages
...the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat, insipid; his comic wit degenerating into clenches,72 his serious swelling into bombast. But he is always...raise himself as high above the rest of poets, Quantum lento, solent inter vibuma cupressi.™ The consideration of this made Mr. Hales of Eton say that there...
Limited preview - About this book

Sources of Dramatic Theory: Volume 1, Plato to Congreve

Michael J. Sidnell - 1991 - 332 pages
...where alike: were he so, I should do him inlury to compare him with the greatest of mankind, He is many times flat, insipid: his comic wit degenerating...presented to him: no man can say he ever had a fit sublect for his wit, and did not then raise himself as high above the rest of the poets .... 'Beaumont...
Limited preview - About this book

Rival Playwrights: Marlowe, Jonson, Shakespeare

James Shapiro - 1991 - 234 pages
...but luckily." Whereas in Jonson's labored art "you find little to retrench or alter," Shakespeare "is many times flat, insipid; his comic wit degenerating into clenches, his serious swelling into bombast."56 The critical terms first offered by Jonson at the turn of the century proved elastic enough...
Limited preview - About this book

William Shakespeare: The Critical Heritage, Volume 5

Brian Vickers - 1995 - 585 pages
...him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat and insipid; his comick wit degenerating into clenches, his serious swelling...himself as high above the rest of poets, Quantum lenta solent inter viburna cupressi. It is to be lamented that such a writer should want a commentary; that...
Limited preview - About this book

The Re-imagined Text: Shakespeare, Adaptation, & Eighteenth-century Literary ...

Jean I. Marsden - 1995 - 214 pages
...Dryden sets the tone, finding Shakespeare both the most brilliant and the dullest of poets: "He is many times flat, insipid; his comic wit degenerating...into clenches, his serious swelling into bombast" (Monk, 55). This objection appears throughout Dryden's essays, particularly in "The Grounds of Criticism...
Limited preview - About this book

Russian Essays on Shakespeare and His Contemporaries

Aleksandr Tikhonovich Parfenov, Joseph G. Price - 1998 - 216 pages
...everywhere alike; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat, insipid; his comic wit degenerating...then raise himself as high above the rest of poets, as cypresses often do among bending osiers. 8 Shakespeare is up to what is great. (According to Dryden,...
Limited preview - About this book

The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations

Elizabeth M. Knowles - 1999 - 1160 pages
...needed not the spectacles of books to read Nature: he looked inwards, and found her there ... He is many times flat, insipid; his comic wit degenerating...serious swelling into bombast. But he is always great. :>n Shakespeare An l-'.ssau of Dramatic I'oesy (1 668) 7 He invades authors like a monarch; and what...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF