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" And missing thee, I walk unseen On the dry smooth-shaven green. To behold the wandering moon, Riding near her highest noon. Like one that had been led astray Through the heaven's wide pathless way, And oft, as if her head she bowed, Stooping through a... "
Morality of Fiction: Or, An Inquiry Into the Tendency of Fictitious ... - Page 168
by Hugh Murray - 1805 - 174 pages
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The Church of England quarterly review, Volume 1

1837 - 646 pages
...'shaven green," or the " arched walks of twilight groves," he beheld the wandering moon, Riding in her highest noon, Like one that had been led astray Through the heaven's wide pathless way." Milton realized the canon of Jonson ; what he borrowed he made his own...
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The Poetical Works of John Milton: With Notes and a Life of the Author, Volume 2

John Milton - 1838 - 496 pages
...even-song ; And missing thee, I walk unseen 65 On the dry smooth-shaven green, To behold the wandering moon, Riding near her highest noon, Like one that...led astray Through the heav'n's wide pathless way ; 70 And oft, as if her head she bovv'd, Stooping through a fleecy cloud. Oft on a plat of rising ground,...
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Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres: Chiefly from the Lectures of Dr. Blair

Hugh Blair, Abraham Mills - 1838 - 372 pages
...passage from the Penseroso : -I walk unseen On the dry, smooth-shaven green, To behold the wandering moon, Riding near her highest noon : Like one that had been led astray Through the heaven's wide pathless way, And oft, as if her head she bow'd, Stooping through a fleecy cloud. Oft,...
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The Saturday Magazine, Volumes 12-13

1838 - 544 pages
...choly have something of a pleasing turn, when we fore» walk forth— To behold the wand'ring MOOD, Riding near her highest noon, Like one that had been led astray Through the heaven's wide pathless way, And oft, as if her head she bowed, Stooping through a fleecy cloud.—...
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The Mythology of Ancient Greece and Italy

Thomas Keightley - 1838 - 1120 pages
...Byz. t>. 'A/Jairis. e Ap. Sch. Eurip. ut mj>. " See Welcker, Tril. 127. ieq. To behold the wandering moon Riding near her highest noon, Like one that had been led tutray Through the heaven's wide pathless way.— Milton. firmation of this theory, we are assured...
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The Poetical Works of John Milton: With Notes and a Life of the Author, Volume 2

John Milton - 1839 - 496 pages
...even-song ; And missing thee, I walk unseen 65 On the dry smooth-shaven green, To behold the wandering moon, Riding near her highest noon, Like one that...led astray Through the heav'n's wide pathless way ; 70 And oft, as if her head she bow'd, Stooping through a fleecy cloud. Oft on a plat of rising ground,...
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The Saturday Magazine, Volume 13

1839 - 272 pages
...country ; such as makes melancholy have something of a pleasing turn, when we love to walk forth — To behold the wand'ring Moon, Riding near her highest...noon, Like one that had been led astray Through the heaven's wide pathless way, And oft, as if her head she bowed, Stooping through a fleecy cloud.—...
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 48

1840 - 880 pages
...sameness of the untrodden sky ? " I walk unseen On the dry smooth-shaven green, To behold the wandering Moon Riding near her highest noon, Like one that had been led astray Through the Heaven's wide pathless way; And oft, as if her head she bowed, Stooping through a fleecy cloud." May...
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Selections from the British Poets, Volume 1

1840 - 372 pages
...even-song ; And, missing thee, I walk unseen On the dry, smooth-shaven green, To behold the wandering moon, Riding near her highest noon, Like one that had been led astray Through the heaven's wide pathless way ; And oft, as if her head she bow'd, Stooping through a fleecy cloud, Oft,...
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Recreations in Astronomy

Lewis Tomlinson - 1840 - 362 pages
...have something of a pleasing turn, when we love to walk forth— To behold the wand'ring Moon, Biding near her highest noon, Like one that had been led astray Through the heaven's wide pathless way, And oft, as if her head she bowed, Stooping through a fleecy cloud. - MILTON'S...
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