Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" ... that the mean longitude of the first satellite, minus three times that of the second, plus twice that of the third, is always equal to two right angles. "
On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences - Page 29
by Mary Somerville - 1834 - 458 pages
Full view - About this book

On the Connection of the Physical Sciences

Mary Somerville - 1846 - 500 pages
...power of analysis. A singular law obtains among the mean motions and mean longitudes of the first three satellites. It appears from observation that the mean...three times that of the second, plus twice that of the thin], is always equal to two right angles. It is proved by theory, that if these relations had only...
Full view - About this book

The solar system [by T. Dick].

Thomas Dick - 1799 - 392 pages
...are performed exactly in the same number of days. It has been found by La Place that " the epoch (or mean longitude) of the first satellite, minus three times that of the second, plus two times that of the third, is exactly equal to a semicircle, or 180 degrees." From this it follows,...
Full view - About this book

Popular Lectures on Astronomy: Delivered at the Royal Observatory of Paris

François Arago - 1848 - 108 pages
...Jupiter, the Earth and the Sun, reader the existence of pha»e« to any otuervable extent impossible. times that of the second, plus twice that of the third, is always equal to two right angles. Herschel, on attentively examining these satellites through the telescope, perceived that the intensity...
Full view - About this book

On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences

Mary Somerville - 1849 - 570 pages
...power of analysis. A singular law obtains among the mean motions and mean longitudes of the first three satellites. It appears from observation that the mean...they are liable. They extend to the synodic motions (K. 92) of the satellites ; consequently they affect their eclipses, and have a very great influence...
Full view - About this book

Manual of astronomy

John Drew - 1853 - 384 pages
...which latter is about half that of the revolution of the third. Again, the mean longitude of the first, minus three times that of the second, plus twice that of the third, is always equal to 180° : hence it results, that when the first satellite is eclipsed, the other two will always dispense...
Full view - About this book

The Solar System: with Moral and Religious Reflections in Reference to the ...

Thomas Dick - 1854 - 360 pages
...performed exactly in the same number of days. It has been found, by La Place, that "the epoch (ot.mean longitude) of the first satellite, minus three times that of the second, plus two times that of the third, is exactly equal to a semicircle, or 180 degrees." From this it follows,...
Full view - About this book

The Dictionary of Arts, Sciences and Manufactures ...: Embracing ..., Volume 1

James Smith (author of the Panorama of science and art.) - 1859 - 966 pages
...three times the mean motion of the second. And the mean sydereal or synodical longitude of the first, minus three times that of the second, plus twice that of the thin!,, is always equal to two right angles. When the satellites fall into the shadow of the primary,...
Full view - About this book

The American Journal of Science and Arts

1860 - 980 pages
...these three bodies approached very near to the relation which renders the mean motion of the first, minus three times that of the second, plus twice that of the third, equal to nothing. Then their mutual attraction, rendered this ratio rigorously exact, and it has moreover...
Full view - About this book

The American Journal of Science and Arts

1860 - 504 pages
...attraction, rendered this ratio rigorously exact, and it has moreover made the mean longitude of the first, minus three times that of the second, plus twice that of the third, equal to a semi-circumference. At the same time, it gave rise to a periodic inequality, which depends...
Full view - About this book

Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania

Royal Society of Tasmania - 1864 - 494 pages
...the time of that of the second ; the second half that of the third ; the mean longitude of the first, minus three times that of the second, plus twice that of the third, is always equal to 180°. Or the angular velocity of the first, added to twice that of the third, is equal to three times...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF